News: Tagged as Web FontFont

Our top 10 most popular webfonts in-use

You may have heard that our Web FontFonts are now supported by 98% of all desktop browsers. With a tantalising typographical treasure trove of 2240 Web FontFonts, it’s sometimes tricky to decide which web font is the best fit for your online brand presence. To provide a little inspiration and help you choose, we’ve brought together a selection of in-use cases of our top ten most popular web fonts that have caught our eye recently. 

FF Meta & FF Meta Serif

Parse by HowThe marvellous FF Meta and FF Meta Serif, Erik Spiekermann’s No-Brainer, feature on this great site Parse by How. Parse is a real smörgåsbord of design content; they scour the web to bring together what they call design ‘tapas for the brain’. 

FF DIN

FF DIN in-use

One of our bestsellers and a real classic typeface, FF DIN, features on the Budget 4 Change website. The thin horizontal strokes and fluent curves of FF DIN provide a sober and solid tone to the site which is dedicated to mapping, tracking and analyzing donor government budgets against official development assistance.

FF Unit & FF Unit Slab

Typolution

Evolution, Revolution, Solution. That is the simple philosophy behind Typolution, the ‘purely’ typographical website that covers the latest developments, innovations and advancements in the industry (all in German). The site uses our very own FF Unit for the body text and FF Unit Slab for the headers, offering a cool yet disciplined tone.

FF Dax

Juventus Member

FF Dax adorns the official team fan page of the football club Juventus, the site is the go-to resource for Juventus fans to join the community of supporters and buy a subscription.

FF Scala & FF Scala Sans

VRB

The website for the VRB (Vorratsgesellschaft) organization based in Germany is set in one of the bestselling and most serious text faces, the formidable FF Scala and FF Scala Sans. The VRB offers ‘off the’ Shelf Companies and legal advice. 

FF Tisa & FF Tisa Sans

Espen Dreyer

Espen Dreyer is a Norwegian freelance photographer and his website packed full of lovely snapshots. Set in one of our most prolific Web FontFonts, FF Tisa and the recently released FF Tisa Sans

FF Kievit

Blossom

The new start-up Blossom, offers a brand new product management tool and features Mike Abbink’s FF Kievit which offers a clean and open touch to their site.

FF Clan

Red Bull Academy Radio

The website of the Red Bull Music Academy Radio really packs a punch with the use of the strong and powerful FF favorite, FF Clan which was designed by Łukasz Dziedzic.

FF Fago

Regmodharz

The mighty fine FF Fago, one of our super families designed by Ole Schäfer, provides a conscious corporate air to the online presence of the green energy project, RegModHarz.

FF Dagny

Two Arms Inc.

Two Arms Inc are a team of two, who combine illustration and design in a delightful manner. Based in Brooklyn they are famed for their passion for screenprinting. Their website employs FF Dagny, by Örjan Nordling and Göran Söderström. Great minds think alike, as we use it on our site too!

We’ve recently received some lovely examples of FontFonts in-use. Keep ’em coming! If you’ve used a FF in a recent project and you’d like to be featured on our site, please email lucy@fontfont.de.

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Web FontFonts now supported by 98% of all desktop browsers!

Since the launch of Web FontFonts, we’ve wanted to keep things simple and make web typefaces that were easy to access, easy to use and easy to license (hence the pay-once self-hosting scheme). We continually work to ensure that our Web FontFonts are the fittest of the fit and are delighted to announce that they are now even more compatible.

Web FontFont Browser Support

According to the most recent statistics from October 2012*, Web FontFonts are supported by about 98 percent of all desktop web browsers in use online. So, if you embed Web FontFonts on your site, virtually every visitor will be able to see them. As if that wasn’t enough, there is hardly any difference in compatibility between Web FontFont self-hosting and getting your fonts from webfont services, as most services support about 98 percent of all desktop browsers as well!

Webfont Browser Support
Our analysis of browser share is based on the version numbers that support Web FontFonts as well as webfont services. The good news is that we expect this percentage to further increase up to 100% as users upgrade to newer browser versions.

*Source: w3schools.com. Only 2.1 % of browsers are not Web FontFont friendly, but we won’t hold that against them.

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FontFont sponsors Webfontday 2012

Web Font Day

We are delighted to be sponsoring this year’s Webfontday! Set up by the Typographical Society Munich (Typographische Gesellschaft München), Webfontday is committed to providing hands-on advice, practical tips and inspiration through fabulous examples. The theme this year is ‘Type goes interface’ and the third Webfontday will take place on Saturday 10 November in Munich.

With the likes of Indra Kupferschmid, David Berlow, and Tim Ahrens the day is jam-packed with talks from type experts and creatives from across the global. Typography expert and author of FontFeed, Yves Peters, will also be giving a talk on Better Web Typography.

There are still a few tickets left, grab yours now!

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New release: FF 60

How quickly the time has flown since FF 59, we can’t quite believe it is release time again. With two new designs, two extensions and a myriad of updates we are delighted to introduce our latest release, FF 60.

The new designs

FF Marselis  

FF Marselis FF Marselis

From the designer of FF Cube and FF Speak comes FF Marselis. Jan Maack’s newest design crossbreeds geometric and humanistic forms, creating a freshly dynamic sans serif family. All of the counters in the typeface are open; certain superfluous strokes have been eliminated – there are no spurs on the b or q, for instance.

Many designers chance upon using the same graphic shape for the lowercase ‘a’ and ‘e’ – indeed, the idea seems simple enough: just rotate the form 180° and you should be done! However, almost all attempts at this sort of theoretical simplification fail in practice. With FF Marselis, Jan Maack has found a key to making it work. Rather than whole letterforms, a tear-drop form repeats throughout the alphabet, not only in the bowl of the lowercase ‘a’ or ‘e’, but also in the ‘k’ and the uppercase ‘Q’. Its distinct character makes FF Marselis a perfect choice for today’s corporate and branding projects.

Introductory offer: You can get 50 % off any FF Marselis product (until 31 October 2012).

FF ThreeSixFF ThreeSixFF ThreeSix

FF ThreeSix is a huge experimental optical type system consisting of six typefaces in eight weights, including four additional monospaced weights. It is the result of London-based Paul McNeil’s and Hamish Muir’s attempts to work within the restrictive rules of geometry to generate simple typographic forms emulating traditional type design principles, where a wide range of almost imperceptible compensatory optical tricks are used to create the illusion of evenness in the basic fabric of text.

The award-winning system – ISTD Premier Award and Certificate of Excellence – is based on a grid of 36 unit squares subdivided into 9 units and are constructed using only vertical or horizontal straight lines and circular arcs. Cap-height, x-height, ascent and descent measurements are consistent across all fonts and weights. The grid also determines character and word spacing, with all side-bearings and kerning pair values conforming to 9 unit increments.

As Wim Crouwel notes: ‘It is a fascination for the use of geometric systems in design that has resulted in these remarkable typefaces.’

Updated and extended FontFonts 

FF Chartwell WebFF Chartwell WebFF Chartwell Web

We always strive to give you the best possible solution. That’s why we didn’t make it easy on ourselves when it came to creating FF Chartwell Web. FF Chartwell already pushes the boundaries of OpenType, so when faced with the prospect of massive font file sizes (up to 47000 glyphs) and a lack of OpenType feature support in most web browsers to make FF Chartwell work on the web, we had to think creatively! Not satisfied with simply converting the desktop fonts into web fonts we sought to transform FF Chartwell into something more than just a font. Using some nifty JavaScript tricks you can now breathe life into charts, pies, graphs online.

Introducing FF Chartwell Web. Simple to use and fun to play around with, you can try it for yourself online using our demo.

Free font: For a limited time, you can get your hands on FF Chartwell Web Radar for free.

FF Meta Correspondence

FF Meta CorrespondenceFF Meta Correpondence

Erik Spiekermann’s best-known face is without doubt FF Meta. While it has proven its usability in almost any design task one can think of, its creator realized that it could be improved even more for use in the business world. The main features of the first version of FF Meta Correspondence included tabular figures (instead of oldstyle ones) and increased tracking, yet Spiekermann wanted to go a few steps further and take the typeface to another level.

Now, Erik Spiekermann and the FontFont team changed both proportions and shapes to a more robust style, removed contrast from accents and simplified forms and details to a more screen-friendly appearance. The very well-known lowercase g has been changed to a single-storey one, which is more common within the office environment. Above all, a set of useful arrows, icons, and office dingbats has been added. The resulting design is still FF Meta, but one that breathes Correspondence air.

The simplified forms and the high-quality screen optimization make FF Meta Correspondence a perfect typeface for use as a webfont or within the mobile environment.

New Office and Web FontFonts plus language extensions

Did you know our library contains over 2500 FontFonts? After a FontFont is released, the work doesn’t stop, we continually tinker and update our beloved FontFonts to ensure that they are in tip-top condition and in the most up to date and useable formats. In FF 60, some of our earliest releases such as Just van Rossum’s FF Advert, Ole Schäfer’s FF Zine, and John Critchley’s FF Child’s Play have been brought up to date and now come in Office and Web formats.

All these faces have also been upgraded so that they are now also offered in Pro versions, meaning they now include more Latin-based languages (e.g. Polish, Turkish, Czech).FF Advert

FF Advert/Rough (NEW: Pro | Offc Pro | Web Pro)

FF Atma Serif

FF Atma Serif (NEW: Pro | Offc | Offc Pro | Web | Web Pro)

FF Child's Play 

FF Child’s Play (NEW: Pro | Offc | Offc Pro | Web | Web Pro) FF Cube

FF Cube (NEW: Pro | Offc | Offc Pro | Web | Web Pro)

FF Eureka Mono

FF Eureka Mono (NEW: Offc | Offc Pro | Web | Web Pro)

FF Fago

FF Fago Mono (NEW: Pro | Offc | Offc Pro | Web | Web Pro)

FF Hydra

FF Hydra/Text (NEW: Pro | Offc Pro | Web Pro)

FF Instant

FF Instant Types (NEW: Pro | Offc Pro | Web Pro)

FF Meta Correspondence

FF Meta Correspondence (NEW: Offc Pro | Web Pro)

FF Typestar

FF Typestar (NEW: Pro | Offc Pro | Web Pro)FF Zine

FF Zine Sans/Serif/Slab Display (NEW: Pro | Offc | Offc Pro | Web | Web Pro)

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In-use: FF Quadraat in ‘The Shape of Design’ – An interview with Frank Chimero

‘A fieldguide for makers. A love letter to Design.’

FF Quadraat in use: ‘The Shape of Design’ by Frank Chimero

The Shape of Design is a beautiful and thought-provoking insight into the role of design as a way of planning and as a medium for change. It’s a veritable handbook not just for designers but for anyone who wants to make something.

Frank Chimero, photo by Jessica HischeWritten by Frank Chimero, a designer, illustrator, teacher and writer based in New York, the book came about following a highly successful Kickstarter campaign in 2011. Set in our very own FF Quadraat by Fred Smeijers,  the Shape of Design is available both in print and as an eBook.

FF Quadraat is one of the FontFont classics and has been part of our library since the early days. Over the years, it has grown into a formidable super family and in 2011 was completely overhauled and updated by Smeijers and our Type Department

We spoke to Frank Chimero about his experience writing the book, his love of reading and his choice of typeface.

Over the past year, numerous great ideas have been brought about through Kickstarter, including films, products, even typefaces. Indeed at the next TypeCon 2012 there will be a whole panel discussion about using Kickstarter as a means to fund new typefaces. How did the experience influence your approach to writing the book?

Kickstarter opens up the creative process to an audience, and makes it feel less like a black box where ‘magic’ happens. This is both good and bad. It’s great because that openness turns a book into a continuum of experiences for the audience. They now have back-story and can connect to the work before they read it. There’s the story of making the story, and you can build a small community of people with that.

On the negative side, that openness turns the process into a kind of performance. The writer has people watching, and that can be stunting. There were several points while writing where things were a total mess, and I felt like I had to be very strategic about what I shared with the backers to make it seem like the train was still on the rails.

But let’s not be too dour about this stuff. The Kickstarter campaign gave me a year to think about the ideas I wanted to pursue. And now, there’s a group of smart people considering those ideas, and in certain cases, running with them. That’s marvelous. A miracle.

FF Quadraat in use: ‘The Shape of Design’ by Frank Chimero

Frank Chimero’s ‘The Shape of Design’ – Table of contents; © Portrait by Jessica Hische

Your book is somewhat classical, in terms of proportion and layout. Your website is more whimsical and light-hearted. Did you find the printed book as a medium somewhat limiting, in terms of design and production possibilities?

No. My design choices were based on the writing, and I decided the words required a simple presentation. There was no need to get fussy with it, because I was confident in the ideas and happy with the writing’s clarity.

Many of the design decisions were also influenced by the affordances of ebooks and their readers. The cover was designed to be very iconic so I had a design system which could transition to each reading environment. The page size of the printed book was chosen to be similar in size to what would be experienced on an iPad or Kindle. The illustrations are two-color, because I knew I could make them look good on a Kindle, iPad, and in print.
Basically, I wanted to design a system that was flexible enough to keep its identity intact as the words went from place to place. I think it is possible to craft books in a way so that no reading environment is obviously inferior to another, whether printed book or ebook. Each piece has to shine on all the other parts to make a better whole.

Would you agree that The Shape of Design isn’t a traditional design book? Whilst there are passages where you mention things about your working process, there aren’t specific case studies presented, images of your work (other than the beautiful illustrations!), or a list of favorite clients, etc. Instead, your book is more a collection of stories about the design process?

I never wanted this book to be about my work or specifically anyone else’s. I think the title speaks to that: The Shape of Design is more about the field’s body of work. What happens if you group all the work together? What are the similarities, and what is it trying to do? Once you start thinking this way, personal examples or in-depth, individual case studies seem inappropriate.

The book is about being tasked to make useful things for others. That means being generous in who it uses as examples, whether graphic designer, poet, or chef. I wanted to pull insight from the outside. It also requires me to shine a light on the creative process in an abstract way, then consider the products of design as things that seek to produce change and be consequential. This runs counter to the usual presentation of design as a set of beautiful artifacts. There’s an important place for that sort of treatment, but this wasn’t it.

FF Quadraat in use: ‘The Shape of Design’ by Frank Chimero

What was your ‘Why’ behind the Shape of Design?

I wrote the Shape of Design because I thought it was important to have a reminder of the effects of our work. There is beauty and consequence and joy to making things for other people, and I thought it deserved a rumination. I initially wrote it for my students, but in the process I discovered I needed it as well.

The Shape of Design is set in FF Quadraat, a rather traditional and classic text typeface. Why did you choose this one?

I read a book of essays by Michael Chabon typeset in FF Quadraat, and was really happy with the effect. The type felt warm and friendly, yet still refined and thoughtful. As you said, FF Quadraat isn’t a traditional text typeface, so reading Chabon’s book was a little bit less fluid than I was used to. It metered my consumption, and gave a better opportunity to reflect after each essay. I decided that this was something important to my book since it’s a shorter title, and while having a full arc, each of the chapters stands on its own.

You were an early adopter of webfonts. Is FF Quadraat the text typeface on your website at the moment because it is also the face of your book? Or, perhaps the other way around?

At first, my selection of FF Quadraat Web wasn’t an overtly conscious decision. I chose it as the typeface in Pages as I wrote, and my words seemed to grow into it. Then I stumbled upon Chabon’s book, became pleased with the fit, and changed my site to use the webfont. We’ve had a good relationship since then.

FF Quadraat in use: ‘The Shape of Design’ by Frank Chimero

Screenshot shapeofthesignbook.com — FF Quadraat is also used
in the book PDF as well as on the website (FF Quadraat Web)

Your book is offered in a printed version and as an eBook. What is your preferred way of reading?

Fiction in print to shut out the world, non-fiction as an ebook to keep track of my marginalia. In either case, if I enjoyed what I read, I buy the nicest printed copy I can find. I want the things I love to be a part of my day-to-day life.

FF Quadraat in use: ‘The Shape of Design’ by Frank Chimero

How did the process of writing this book compare to other long-term graphic design projects you have tackled?

I wrote this book over the course of a year, and I noticed that I developed a ‘window of approval’ that my lengthier design projects never had. I felt the things I had recently written were good, but the old parts always needed work, even if liked them before. So, I was perpetually out of sync with myself, where the person who was reading the words was conceptually further along than the writer who wrote them. It meant that I was growing, but it also felt like I was never getting closer to finishing, because I’d always have to go back two months later and fix what I wrote. Snake eating its tail, and all that.

My frustration came from a misunderstanding I think many of us have about creative work: we forget that doing the work makes us better, and being better makes us dislike the work that made us that way. Design seems to be more friendly to this problem, because big projects are typically released piece by piece, and you can course-correct over time. The work can exist in flux, where as a book has a canonical version. Books, unfortunately, must be printed all at once, so it’s easier to worry and toil endlessly. Now I understand why many authors spend five years on a book.

I thought writing a book wouldn’t be much different from writing essays. That was a naive thought. It is totally and fundamentally different, simply because you can’t hold a whole book in your head at once.

You have a fantastic ‘library’ section on your website, with brief descriptions of 45 books. Do you think that we’ll see more and more books like The Shape of Design in the future?

I hope so! There are solid fundraising platforms like Kickstarter, and small-run and vanity presses like Lulu and Blurb. Right now, there’s little in the way of someone publishing their thoughts, they only need to muster up the time and focus (which is a battle on its own).

I am excited about what’s to come. I foresee more opportunities to share what we write, and better things to read. It’s a good time to like words.

FF Quadraat in use: ‘The Shape of Design’ by Frank Chimero

Find out more about the Shape of Design and buy it online and see more pictures of FF Quadraat in use in the book in our gallery.

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IE10 unlocks CSS OpenType features for Webfonts

With Mozilla’s Firefox and Microsoft’s upcoming Internet Explorer 10, a significant step has been taken toward widespread OpenType feature support, which allows for things like discretionary ligatures in text and contextual alternates in display. Now with standards solidifying, a level of typographic sophistication previously unachievable anywhere will soon be realized. Ushering in the new browser, we share this demo page with live examples of OpenType features at work. (Note that unless viewed in IE10 or a recent version of Firefox or some other new-ish Mozilla browser, the demos won’t make much sense.)

We move ahead now to take a closer look into each of the examples, and discuss what’s required before we can get started taking full advantage of this new ability. Contextual Swashes: FF Nexus Serif

Contextual Swashes | FF Nexus Serif Italic is the most comprehensive font of the FF Nexus Superfamily, containing beautiful sets of swash letters for the beginnings and ends of words. Thanks to the Contextual Swashes feature, the swash variants of the letters appear automatically in the appropriate positions (as opposed to the “regular” Swashes feature, in which you would have to decide yourself which letters should be swashed).

 Stylistic Sets: FF Unit

Stylistic Sets | FF Unit holds the library’s record for Stylistic Sets: It has a whopping 14 sets to tailor the look of selected letters to your needs. (39 OT Features in total!)

Contextual Alternates: FF Mister K

Contextual Alternates | FF Mister K isn’t available as a Web FontFont yet, and if you switch off the Contextual Alternates feature on the demo site you’ll see why: It just makes no sense to use it without the connections and letter variants that give FF Mister K its special look.

Small Caps: FF Ernestine

Small Caps | FF Ernestine is one of the few FontFonts containing two sets of small caps: Small and Petite Caps (the only other Petite Cap FontFont being FF Atma Serif). While Small Caps are available as separate Web FontFonts now, Petite Caps only become accessible through browser OpenType feature support.

Discretionary Ligatures: FF Milo Serif

Discretionary Ligatures | FF Milo Serif is one of the FontFonts that go wild with extravagant ligatures.

Oldtyle Figures: FF DIN Round

Ligatures: FF Tartine Script

Oldstyle Figures and Ligatures | FF DIN Round and FF Tartine Script can actually look like this on your website right now! Unlike the other features shown above, Oldstyle Figures and Ligatures are included (if available in the design) in all WOFF Web FontFonts today. There’s one more feature we didn’t even mention on the demo page: The Kerning feature is activated for the whole demo page. It is most noticeable in combinations like “We” and “y.”, which just look more even with kerning. This feature is included in the current WOFF Web FontFonts and is applied automatically by some browsers.

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New release: FF59

It is with much anticipation and excitement that we announce our 59th release. With three brand new designs, one extension and a whole array of new Offc, Web and Pro versions of some of our classic FontFonts; FF 59 is one of our biggest releases yet.

The new designs

FF Scuba

FF Scuba

FF Scuba is a legible contemporary sans with a distinctive character. Searching for an offline companion for Verdana and not finding the exact tone he was looking for, designer Felix Braden set off to develop a new series of types. The resulting family is a bit tighter and more condensed than Verdana. In small sizes FF Scuba blends well with Verdana, and in display sizes it reveals its particular originality. The design combines constructed letters, like an almost rectangular o, with dynamic strokes and other elements referring to writing. This mix gives the typeface a lively touch, while still keeping true to its technical roots.

For a limited time, FF Scuba Regular is available for free download in OT and Web formats. Download it on the Goodies page.

FF Tisa Sans

FF Tisa Sans

FF Tisa Sans is Slovenian designer Mitja Miklavčič’s follow-up typeface to FF Tisa. Whether used together or separately, both of his families are excellent choices for branding projects and complex editorial applications. The original FF Tisa is one of the new-millennium favorites in the FontFont library—known for its sturdy and friendly forms, hence its common use in newspapers and magazines.

In all important details, FF Tisa Sans matches FF Tisa perfectly. Aside from the lack of serifs, the Sans features slightly reduced ink traps. Necessary system elements have been fine-tuned to one another, including  the color density of blocks of text, the proportions of the letterforms and their distinctive stroke endings, and even the eye-catching Italics. Of course, the FF Tisa Sans character set contains the same range of characters and typographic features as the original FF Tisa, too. Since FF Tisa Sans should prove quite suitable for signage and information design projects, Miklavčič included a range of specially designed arrows in each font as well.

FF Chartwell

FF Chartwell

Designed by Travis Kochel, FF Chartwell is a fantastic typeface for creating simple graphs. Driven by the frustration of creating graphs within design applications and inspired by typefaces such as FF Beowolf and ­­FF PicLig, Travis saw an opportunity to take advantage of OpenType technology to simplify the process.

FF Chartwell (Pies, Lines, Bars) was originally released in 2011 under the TK Type foundry. In 2012, it was added to the FontFont library with the addition of four new chart styles, the ­­ Polar Series as well as Bars Vertical.

The Polar Series (Rose, Rings, and Radar) is a set of new designs, which take on the form of more experimental charts. In an effort to make the charts smarter and more dynamic, each design reacts not only to the data entered, but the number of values.

Find out how to use FF Chartwell and download the User Manual.

Updated and extended FontFonts

FF Meta Serif: Light and Extra Bold

 

FF Meta Serif

Following the Greek/Cyrillic language update to FF Meta Serif in FF 58, we’ve now added two new weights to FF Meta Serif—Light and Extra Bold.

New Pro versions

Pro FontFonts enjoy the distinction of extended language support and ease of use, affording the typographer the ability to set text in a much broader range of languages. All Pro FontFonts include Extended Latin (Central European) characters, but may additionally support Cyrillic, Greek, or other/additional scripts. The following FontFonts now include Pro language support and thus speaking 36 Latin-based languages more.

FF Blur

FF Blur Pro by Neville Brody

FF Legato

FF Legato Pro by Evert Bloemsma

FF Magda Clean

FF Magda Clean Pro by Cornel Windlin, Critzla and Henning Krause

FF Market

FF Market Pro by H. A. Simon

FF Max Demi Serif

FF Max Demi Serif Pro by Morten Olsen

FF Meta Headline

FF Meta Headline Pro by Erik SpiekermannChristian Schwartz and Josh Darden 

FF Prater

FF Prater Pro by Henning Wagenbreth  and Steffen Sauerteig

FF Quadraat and FF Quadraat Sans Mono

FF Quadraat Display Pro & FF Quadraat Sans Mono by Fred Smeijers 

FF Schulbuch

FF Schulbuch Pro by Just van Rossum

FF Strada & FF Strada Condensed

FF Strada Pro & FF Strada Condensed Pro by Albert Pinggera

New Office and Web FontFonts

We are continually updating our library to ensure that our FontFonts are in the most up to date and useable formats. With our latest release, we’ve updated a whole host of our portfolio for the use on the web, among them classics such as FF Strada, FF Legato, FF Transit, and FF Schulbuch.

All these faces additionally come in Offc versions, fonts tuned to work best in programs like Microsoft Word or PowerPoint.

FF Blur

FF Blur Offc Pro/Web Pro by Neville Brody

FF Eureka, FF Eureka Sans & FF Eureka Sans Condensed

FF Eureka Offc Pro/Web Pro, FF Eureka Sans Offc Pro/Web Pro and FF Eureka Sans Condensed Offc Pro/Web Pro by Peter Biľak

FF Fago Correspondence

FF Fago Correspondence Sans Offc Pro/Web Pro and FF Fago Correspondence Serif Offc Pro/Web Pro by Ole Schäfer and Andreas Eigendorf

FF Legato

FF Legato Offc Pro/Web Pro by Evert Bloemsma

FF Magda Clean

FF Magda Clean Offc Pro/Web Pro by Cornel Windlin, Critzla and Henning Krause

FF Market

FF Market Offc Pro/Web Pro by H. A. Simon

FF Max & FF Max Demi Serif

FF Max Offc Pro/Web Pro & FF Max Demi Serif Offc Pro/Web Pro by Morten Olsen

FF Meta Headline

FF Meta Headline Offc Pro/Web Pro by Erik SpiekermannChristian SchwartzJosh Darden 

FF Prater

FF Prater Offc Pro/Web Pro by Henning WagenbrethSteffen Sauerteig

FF Quadraat and FF Quadraat Sans Mono

FF Quadraat Display Offc Pro/Web Pro & FF Quadraat Sans Mono by Fred Smeijers 

FF Schulbuch

FF Schulbuch Offc Pro/Web Pro by Just van Rossum

FF Seria & FF Seria Sans

FF Seria Offc Pro/Web Pro & FF Seria Sans Off Pro/Web Pro by Martin Majoor

FF Strada & FF Strada Condensed

FF Strada Offc Pro/Web Pro & FF Strada Condensed Offc Pro/Web Pro by Albert Pinggera 

FF Transit

FF Transit Offc Pro/Web Pro by MetaDesign

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New Release: FF58

BERLIN, GERMANY, December 2011 – FontShop International announced the latest additions to its award-winning FontFont® typeface library.

New Design

FF Ernestine

FF Ernestine

FF Ernestine was born from the search for a versatile monoline text typeface that would feel warm yet serious, feminine yet firm, charming yet sturdy. This resulted in a strong slab serif with playful ball terminals. Its rather large x-height and wide, open shapes enable it to work well down to small sizes; ligatures, stylistic and contextual alternates, a selection of arrows, and two sizes of small caps enrich its typographic palette.

Nina Stössinger first drew the Roman as a study project at the postgraduate Type Design programme in Zurich, and the Italic in dialogue with Hrant Papazian’s Armenian design. Both the Roman and the Italic (which doubles as a harmonious companion to the Armenian component) are available in four individually drawn weights. The four corresponding Armenian weights, nicknamed “Vem” —integrated in the Roman and Italic fonts in the Pro version— share the personable character of the family with proportions optimized for the Armenian script.

Updated and Extended FontFonts

After fonts are released, work continues behind the scenes to improve and extend the usefulness of the faces with the addition of new weights and greater language support. FontFont is pleased to announce extensions to the following typefaces, available immediately.

FF Quadraat and FF Quadraat Sans: Revised and Extended (New Weights, Pro Language Support Including Cyrillic)

FF Quadraat

Fred Smeijers has completely overhauled his most popular superfamily. Both FF Quadraat and FF Quadraat Sans get a noticeable update to their designs. FF Quadraat also adds a new weight, Demi Bold, to the family, FF Quadraat Sans and Sans Condensed now come in the additional weights Thin, Extra Light, Light and Demi Bold. They are now available as Pro versions, including support for both the Latin Extended and Cyrillic character sets.

Learn more about the revised FF Quadraat superfamily in this special specimen PDF (2.8 MB).

Download specimen PDF (2.8 MB).

FF Meta Serif: Extended Language Support (Cyrillic & Greek)

FF Meta Serif

FF Meta Serif by Erik Spiekermann, Christian Schwartz and Kris Sowersby now speaks more languages with glyph support extended to cover Cyrillic and Greek alphabets. FF Meta Serif joins its popular sans companion, FF Meta, in offering this broad range of linguistic ability.

FF Signa: Extended (New Weights)

FF Signa

Ole Søndergaard continues to expand his popular super family FF Signa with another addition. The face adds six fonts in three new weights: Extra Light, Extra Black, and Ultra, each with its italic companion. They all support Cyrillic.

New Office and Web FontFonts

FF QType

FF QType by Achaz Reuss offers its additional weights, Compressed, Condensed, Extended, and Semi Extended in new formats, Office and Web. Just a refresher: Offc FontFonts are the best choice for all who work with the widely-used Office apps like Word®, Excel® and PowerPoint®. Pro means that it also supports additional languages (Latin Extended).

FF Skill Sets: The Right Fonts for All Purposes

With thousands of FontFonts to choose from, the options can be as daunting as they are exciting. So let the experts do the work for you. Typography masters Erik Spiekermann and Jürgen Siebert handpicked the best FontFonts, and compiled them in three Skill Sets — for advertising, editorial, and corporate design. Simply select which Skill Set best suits your practice, and you can start designing without fuss. Not only will you have all the right fonts licensed in one collection, you’ll save a bundle of cash too.

Learn more about FontFont Skill Sets here.

FontFont Library Tiers

Introducing FontFont Library Tiers: Premium, Collection and Free

In an effort to minimize the amount of time customers spend choosing fonts, we have split our library into three distinct tiers, dubbed the FontFont Library Tier system. Watch out for further information that will come in another post next week.

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New Release: FF57

BERLIN, GERMANY, October 2011 – FontShop International announced the latest additions to its award-winning FontFont® typeface library.

Redesign and new styles

FF Karbid: Revised & extended

FF Karbid Slab
FF Karbid Slab in use, Book design Janet Cardiff & George Bures Miller ‘The Murder of Crows’ (Hatje Cantz, 2011)

Originally published in only three text weights and one display version in 1999, the original FF Karbid is an interpretation of vintage German storefront lettering from the early 1900s. Verena Gerlach collected and documented a lot of these alphabets in the Berlin quarters Prenzlauer Berg and Mitte. Although they have now almost completely disappeared due to the renovation works in the unified German capital, the spirit of those characteristic letters lives on in the concept of FF Karbid.

FF Karbid now offers a balanced range of five weights—from Light to Black—each with matching obliques. All versions of FF Karbid offer numerous alternate characters that alter their appearance and mood. These are based on the rather eccentric forms of Art Deco lettering—low- and high-waisted capitals; round versions of A, C, E; single-storey a & g, and many more. The fonts include numerous figure sets, arrows and bullets, and offer Latin Extended language support.

Families

The new FF Karbid is a harmonized redesign of the original typeface. Rounder and less narrow letters lend the shapes more space and balance. Although the contrast was reduced to obtain a harmonious monolinear typeface (without losing its liveliness) it was increased in the bolder weights to improve legibility and achieve a certain elegance. FF Karbid Display is the most obvious spin-off of the original FF Karbid. More than merely having been assimilated, the letter forms were revised according to the new concept. The FF Karbid family has been augmented with two entirely new sub-families. The first one, the Text version, is intended for body copy in small sizes. The eccentric, serif-like swashes in select letters have been abandoned, while the friendly, lively forms of l, y, z and Z show the close relationship to the FF Karbid family. The other new sub-family is a Slab version. It has a sober, journalistic character, inspired by the typography in magazines of the 1920s (see Memphis, etc.). The strong serifs lend the typeface footing and an air of reliability. To improve legibility and balance the contrast was increased in comparison to the sans serif version.

Updated and extended FontFonts

FontFont continues its steady conversion of its library in Web & Office versions. This time FF Nexus and FF Signa Serif were released in both font formats.

Language extensions continue as well: FF Unit Pro speaks Cyrillic and Greek now.

FF Nexus Mix, FF Nexus Serif, FF Nexus Sans, FF Nexus Typewriter

FF Nexus

Ten years after his iconic FF Scala, Martin Majoor expanded his idea of “two typefaces; one form principle” into “three typefaces; one form principle.” The result: a new family of typefaces. FF Nexus borrows some of its structure from FF Scala, but adds the slab-like FF Nexus Mix and monospaced FF Nexus Typewriter to the set. The four coordinated families form a powerhouse type system, combining elegance with versatility. Web and office versions are now available.

FF Signa Serif

FF Signa is a typically Danish typeface by Ole Søndergaard, rooted in architectural lettering rather than book typography. Concise letterforms and a minimum of detail produce clear and harmonious word images. Designed for the Danish Design Center, it is used there for printed material and exhibitions as well as the internal signage system. There are Condensed, Extended and Correspondence versions, and in 2005 FF Signa Serif joined the family. Now the web and office versions are also available for FF Signa Serif.

FF Unit

FF Unit Showing

FF Unit was designed by Erik Spiekermann and produced by Christian Schwartz. FF Unit is the grown-up, no-nonsense sister of Spiekermann’s famous FF Meta. With FF Unit, puppy fat is off, some curves are gone and the shapes are tighter. While FF Meta has always been a little out-of-line and not exactly an over-engineered typeface, FF Unit is less outspoken and more disciplined. It is—like FF Meta—very suitable for use quite small and large, but FF Unit lacks some of the diagonal strokes and curves that give FF Meta its slight informality. However, FF Unit is not cold or uptight, just cool: no redundant ornamentation, just a lot of character. The tighter shapes make it suitable for big headlines set tight. Smaller sizes benefit from the increased contrast between vertical and horizontal strokes and open spacing. Thin and Light perform well set large, displaying the characters to their advantage. There is a great difference in weight between the Thin and Ultra, providing a good range of weights for contrasting combinations. Alternative characters (a, g, i, j, l, U, M) make for interesting headlines. The Small Caps are a bit larger than normal, making them suitable for abbreviations and acronyms. The many weights include old style, regular, and tabular figures. FF Unit Pro is now available with Cyrillic and Greek character sets. The entire FF Unit super family consists of FF Unit, FF Unit Slab, and FF Unit Rounded.

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FontFonter Bookmarklet now available

FontFonter.com is an innovative web tool by FontFont that lets you temporarily replace a site’s fonts with Web FontFonts. With the new FontFonter Bookmarklet you can try Web FontFonts on any website! Installing it is easy: simply drag the bookmarklet on FontFonter.com to your bookmarks toolbar.

Here are the latest Web FontFonts to be added to FontFonter.com:

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