News: Tagged as Office FontFont

New release: FF 60

How quickly the time has flown since FF 59, we can’t quite believe it is release time again. With two new designs, two extensions and a myriad of updates we are delighted to introduce our latest release, FF 60.

The new designs

FF Marselis  

FF Marselis FF Marselis

From the designer of FF Cube and FF Speak comes FF Marselis. Jan Maack’s newest design crossbreeds geometric and humanistic forms, creating a freshly dynamic sans serif family. All of the counters in the typeface are open; certain superfluous strokes have been eliminated – there are no spurs on the b or q, for instance.

Many designers chance upon using the same graphic shape for the lowercase ‘a’ and ‘e’ – indeed, the idea seems simple enough: just rotate the form 180° and you should be done! However, almost all attempts at this sort of theoretical simplification fail in practice. With FF Marselis, Jan Maack has found a key to making it work. Rather than whole letterforms, a tear-drop form repeats throughout the alphabet, not only in the bowl of the lowercase ‘a’ or ‘e’, but also in the ‘k’ and the uppercase ‘Q’. Its distinct character makes FF Marselis a perfect choice for today’s corporate and branding projects.

Introductory offer: You can get 50 % off any FF Marselis product (until 31 October 2012).

FF ThreeSixFF ThreeSixFF ThreeSix

FF ThreeSix is a huge experimental optical type system consisting of six typefaces in eight weights, including four additional monospaced weights. It is the result of London-based Paul McNeil’s and Hamish Muir’s attempts to work within the restrictive rules of geometry to generate simple typographic forms emulating traditional type design principles, where a wide range of almost imperceptible compensatory optical tricks are used to create the illusion of evenness in the basic fabric of text.

The award-winning system – ISTD Premier Award and Certificate of Excellence – is based on a grid of 36 unit squares subdivided into 9 units and are constructed using only vertical or horizontal straight lines and circular arcs. Cap-height, x-height, ascent and descent measurements are consistent across all fonts and weights. The grid also determines character and word spacing, with all side-bearings and kerning pair values conforming to 9 unit increments.

As Wim Crouwel notes: ‘It is a fascination for the use of geometric systems in design that has resulted in these remarkable typefaces.’

Updated and extended FontFonts 

FF Chartwell WebFF Chartwell WebFF Chartwell Web

We always strive to give you the best possible solution. That’s why we didn’t make it easy on ourselves when it came to creating FF Chartwell Web. FF Chartwell already pushes the boundaries of OpenType, so when faced with the prospect of massive font file sizes (up to 47000 glyphs) and a lack of OpenType feature support in most web browsers to make FF Chartwell work on the web, we had to think creatively! Not satisfied with simply converting the desktop fonts into web fonts we sought to transform FF Chartwell into something more than just a font. Using some nifty JavaScript tricks you can now breathe life into charts, pies, graphs online.

Introducing FF Chartwell Web. Simple to use and fun to play around with, you can try it for yourself online using our demo.

Free font: For a limited time, you can get your hands on FF Chartwell Web Radar for free.

FF Meta Correspondence

FF Meta CorrespondenceFF Meta Correpondence

Erik Spiekermann’s best-known face is without doubt FF Meta. While it has proven its usability in almost any design task one can think of, its creator realized that it could be improved even more for use in the business world. The main features of the first version of FF Meta Correspondence included tabular figures (instead of oldstyle ones) and increased tracking, yet Spiekermann wanted to go a few steps further and take the typeface to another level.

Now, Erik Spiekermann and the FontFont team changed both proportions and shapes to a more robust style, removed contrast from accents and simplified forms and details to a more screen-friendly appearance. The very well-known lowercase g has been changed to a single-storey one, which is more common within the office environment. Above all, a set of useful arrows, icons, and office dingbats has been added. The resulting design is still FF Meta, but one that breathes Correspondence air.

The simplified forms and the high-quality screen optimization make FF Meta Correspondence a perfect typeface for use as a webfont or within the mobile environment.

New Office and Web FontFonts plus language extensions

Did you know our library contains over 2500 FontFonts? After a FontFont is released, the work doesn’t stop, we continually tinker and update our beloved FontFonts to ensure that they are in tip-top condition and in the most up to date and useable formats. In FF 60, some of our earliest releases such as Just van Rossum’s FF Advert, Ole Schäfer’s FF Zine, and John Critchley’s FF Child’s Play have been brought up to date and now come in Office and Web formats.

All these faces have also been upgraded so that they are now also offered in Pro versions, meaning they now include more Latin-based languages (e.g. Polish, Turkish, Czech).FF Advert

FF Advert/Rough (NEW: Pro | Offc Pro | Web Pro)

FF Atma Serif

FF Atma Serif (NEW: Pro | Offc | Offc Pro | Web | Web Pro)

FF Child's Play 

FF Child’s Play (NEW: Pro | Offc | Offc Pro | Web | Web Pro) FF Cube

FF Cube (NEW: Pro | Offc | Offc Pro | Web | Web Pro)

FF Eureka Mono

FF Eureka Mono (NEW: Offc | Offc Pro | Web | Web Pro)

FF Fago

FF Fago Mono (NEW: Pro | Offc | Offc Pro | Web | Web Pro)

FF Hydra

FF Hydra/Text (NEW: Pro | Offc Pro | Web Pro)

FF Instant

FF Instant Types (NEW: Pro | Offc Pro | Web Pro)

FF Meta Correspondence

FF Meta Correspondence (NEW: Offc Pro | Web Pro)

FF Typestar

FF Typestar (NEW: Pro | Offc Pro | Web Pro)FF Zine

FF Zine Sans/Serif/Slab Display (NEW: Pro | Offc | Offc Pro | Web | Web Pro)

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New release: FF59

It is with much anticipation and excitement that we announce our 59th release. With three brand new designs, one extension and a whole array of new Offc, Web and Pro versions of some of our classic FontFonts; FF 59 is one of our biggest releases yet.

The new designs

FF Scuba

FF Scuba

FF Scuba is a legible contemporary sans with a distinctive character. Searching for an offline companion for Verdana and not finding the exact tone he was looking for, designer Felix Braden set off to develop a new series of types. The resulting family is a bit tighter and more condensed than Verdana. In small sizes FF Scuba blends well with Verdana, and in display sizes it reveals its particular originality. The design combines constructed letters, like an almost rectangular o, with dynamic strokes and other elements referring to writing. This mix gives the typeface a lively touch, while still keeping true to its technical roots.

For a limited time, FF Scuba Regular is available for free download in OT and Web formats. Download it on the Goodies page.

FF Tisa Sans

FF Tisa Sans

FF Tisa Sans is Slovenian designer Mitja Miklavčič’s follow-up typeface to FF Tisa. Whether used together or separately, both of his families are excellent choices for branding projects and complex editorial applications. The original FF Tisa is one of the new-millennium favorites in the FontFont library—known for its sturdy and friendly forms, hence its common use in newspapers and magazines.

In all important details, FF Tisa Sans matches FF Tisa perfectly. Aside from the lack of serifs, the Sans features slightly reduced ink traps. Necessary system elements have been fine-tuned to one another, including  the color density of blocks of text, the proportions of the letterforms and their distinctive stroke endings, and even the eye-catching Italics. Of course, the FF Tisa Sans character set contains the same range of characters and typographic features as the original FF Tisa, too. Since FF Tisa Sans should prove quite suitable for signage and information design projects, Miklavčič included a range of specially designed arrows in each font as well.

FF Chartwell

FF Chartwell

Designed by Travis Kochel, FF Chartwell is a fantastic typeface for creating simple graphs. Driven by the frustration of creating graphs within design applications and inspired by typefaces such as FF Beowolf and ­­FF PicLig, Travis saw an opportunity to take advantage of OpenType technology to simplify the process.

FF Chartwell (Pies, Lines, Bars) was originally released in 2011 under the TK Type foundry. In 2012, it was added to the FontFont library with the addition of four new chart styles, the ­­ Polar Series as well as Bars Vertical.

The Polar Series (Rose, Rings, and Radar) is a set of new designs, which take on the form of more experimental charts. In an effort to make the charts smarter and more dynamic, each design reacts not only to the data entered, but the number of values.

Find out how to use FF Chartwell and download the User Manual.

Updated and extended FontFonts

FF Meta Serif: Light and Extra Bold

 

FF Meta Serif

Following the Greek/Cyrillic language update to FF Meta Serif in FF 58, we’ve now added two new weights to FF Meta Serif—Light and Extra Bold.

New Pro versions

Pro FontFonts enjoy the distinction of extended language support and ease of use, affording the typographer the ability to set text in a much broader range of languages. All Pro FontFonts include Extended Latin (Central European) characters, but may additionally support Cyrillic, Greek, or other/additional scripts. The following FontFonts now include Pro language support and thus speaking 36 Latin-based languages more.

FF Blur

FF Blur Pro by Neville Brody

FF Legato

FF Legato Pro by Evert Bloemsma

FF Magda Clean

FF Magda Clean Pro by Cornel Windlin, Critzla and Henning Krause

FF Market

FF Market Pro by H. A. Simon

FF Max Demi Serif

FF Max Demi Serif Pro by Morten Olsen

FF Meta Headline

FF Meta Headline Pro by Erik SpiekermannChristian Schwartz and Josh Darden 

FF Prater

FF Prater Pro by Henning Wagenbreth  and Steffen Sauerteig

FF Quadraat and FF Quadraat Sans Mono

FF Quadraat Display Pro & FF Quadraat Sans Mono by Fred Smeijers 

FF Schulbuch

FF Schulbuch Pro by Just van Rossum

FF Strada & FF Strada Condensed

FF Strada Pro & FF Strada Condensed Pro by Albert Pinggera

New Office and Web FontFonts

We are continually updating our library to ensure that our FontFonts are in the most up to date and useable formats. With our latest release, we’ve updated a whole host of our portfolio for the use on the web, among them classics such as FF Strada, FF Legato, FF Transit, and FF Schulbuch.

All these faces additionally come in Offc versions, fonts tuned to work best in programs like Microsoft Word or PowerPoint.

FF Blur

FF Blur Offc Pro/Web Pro by Neville Brody

FF Eureka, FF Eureka Sans & FF Eureka Sans Condensed

FF Eureka Offc Pro/Web Pro, FF Eureka Sans Offc Pro/Web Pro and FF Eureka Sans Condensed Offc Pro/Web Pro by Peter Biľak

FF Fago Correspondence

FF Fago Correspondence Sans Offc Pro/Web Pro and FF Fago Correspondence Serif Offc Pro/Web Pro by Ole Schäfer and Andreas Eigendorf

FF Legato

FF Legato Offc Pro/Web Pro by Evert Bloemsma

FF Magda Clean

FF Magda Clean Offc Pro/Web Pro by Cornel Windlin, Critzla and Henning Krause

FF Market

FF Market Offc Pro/Web Pro by H. A. Simon

FF Max & FF Max Demi Serif

FF Max Offc Pro/Web Pro & FF Max Demi Serif Offc Pro/Web Pro by Morten Olsen

FF Meta Headline

FF Meta Headline Offc Pro/Web Pro by Erik SpiekermannChristian SchwartzJosh Darden 

FF Prater

FF Prater Offc Pro/Web Pro by Henning WagenbrethSteffen Sauerteig

FF Quadraat and FF Quadraat Sans Mono

FF Quadraat Display Offc Pro/Web Pro & FF Quadraat Sans Mono by Fred Smeijers 

FF Schulbuch

FF Schulbuch Offc Pro/Web Pro by Just van Rossum

FF Seria & FF Seria Sans

FF Seria Offc Pro/Web Pro & FF Seria Sans Off Pro/Web Pro by Martin Majoor

FF Strada & FF Strada Condensed

FF Strada Offc Pro/Web Pro & FF Strada Condensed Offc Pro/Web Pro by Albert Pinggera 

FF Transit

FF Transit Offc Pro/Web Pro by MetaDesign

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New Release: FF58

BERLIN, GERMANY, December 2011 – FontShop International announced the latest additions to its award-winning FontFont® typeface library.

New Design

FF Ernestine

FF Ernestine

FF Ernestine was born from the search for a versatile monoline text typeface that would feel warm yet serious, feminine yet firm, charming yet sturdy. This resulted in a strong slab serif with playful ball terminals. Its rather large x-height and wide, open shapes enable it to work well down to small sizes; ligatures, stylistic and contextual alternates, a selection of arrows, and two sizes of small caps enrich its typographic palette.

Nina Stössinger first drew the Roman as a study project at the postgraduate Type Design programme in Zurich, and the Italic in dialogue with Hrant Papazian’s Armenian design. Both the Roman and the Italic (which doubles as a harmonious companion to the Armenian component) are available in four individually drawn weights. The four corresponding Armenian weights, nicknamed “Vem” —integrated in the Roman and Italic fonts in the Pro version— share the personable character of the family with proportions optimized for the Armenian script.

Updated and Extended FontFonts

After fonts are released, work continues behind the scenes to improve and extend the usefulness of the faces with the addition of new weights and greater language support. FontFont is pleased to announce extensions to the following typefaces, available immediately.

FF Quadraat and FF Quadraat Sans: Revised and Extended (New Weights, Pro Language Support Including Cyrillic)

FF Quadraat

Fred Smeijers has completely overhauled his most popular superfamily. Both FF Quadraat and FF Quadraat Sans get a noticeable update to their designs. FF Quadraat also adds a new weight, Demi Bold, to the family, FF Quadraat Sans and Sans Condensed now come in the additional weights Thin, Extra Light, Light and Demi Bold. They are now available as Pro versions, including support for both the Latin Extended and Cyrillic character sets.

Learn more about the revised FF Quadraat superfamily in this special specimen PDF (2.8 MB).

Download specimen PDF (2.8 MB).

FF Meta Serif: Extended Language Support (Cyrillic & Greek)

FF Meta Serif

FF Meta Serif by Erik Spiekermann, Christian Schwartz and Kris Sowersby now speaks more languages with glyph support extended to cover Cyrillic and Greek alphabets. FF Meta Serif joins its popular sans companion, FF Meta, in offering this broad range of linguistic ability.

FF Signa: Extended (New Weights)

FF Signa

Ole Søndergaard continues to expand his popular super family FF Signa with another addition. The face adds six fonts in three new weights: Extra Light, Extra Black, and Ultra, each with its italic companion. They all support Cyrillic.

New Office and Web FontFonts

FF QType

FF QType by Achaz Reuss offers its additional weights, Compressed, Condensed, Extended, and Semi Extended in new formats, Office and Web. Just a refresher: Offc FontFonts are the best choice for all who work with the widely-used Office apps like Word®, Excel® and PowerPoint®. Pro means that it also supports additional languages (Latin Extended).

FF Skill Sets: The Right Fonts for All Purposes

With thousands of FontFonts to choose from, the options can be as daunting as they are exciting. So let the experts do the work for you. Typography masters Erik Spiekermann and Jürgen Siebert handpicked the best FontFonts, and compiled them in three Skill Sets — for advertising, editorial, and corporate design. Simply select which Skill Set best suits your practice, and you can start designing without fuss. Not only will you have all the right fonts licensed in one collection, you’ll save a bundle of cash too.

Learn more about FontFont Skill Sets here.

FontFont Library Tiers

Introducing FontFont Library Tiers: Premium, Collection and Free

In an effort to minimize the amount of time customers spend choosing fonts, we have split our library into three distinct tiers, dubbed the FontFont Library Tier system. Watch out for further information that will come in another post next week.

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New Release: FF57

BERLIN, GERMANY, October 2011 – FontShop International announced the latest additions to its award-winning FontFont® typeface library.

Redesign and new styles

FF Karbid: Revised & extended

FF Karbid Slab
FF Karbid Slab in use, Book design Janet Cardiff & George Bures Miller ‘The Murder of Crows’ (Hatje Cantz, 2011)

Originally published in only three text weights and one display version in 1999, the original FF Karbid is an interpretation of vintage German storefront lettering from the early 1900s. Verena Gerlach collected and documented a lot of these alphabets in the Berlin quarters Prenzlauer Berg and Mitte. Although they have now almost completely disappeared due to the renovation works in the unified German capital, the spirit of those characteristic letters lives on in the concept of FF Karbid.

FF Karbid now offers a balanced range of five weights—from Light to Black—each with matching obliques. All versions of FF Karbid offer numerous alternate characters that alter their appearance and mood. These are based on the rather eccentric forms of Art Deco lettering—low- and high-waisted capitals; round versions of A, C, E; single-storey a & g, and many more. The fonts include numerous figure sets, arrows and bullets, and offer Latin Extended language support.

Families

The new FF Karbid is a harmonized redesign of the original typeface. Rounder and less narrow letters lend the shapes more space and balance. Although the contrast was reduced to obtain a harmonious monolinear typeface (without losing its liveliness) it was increased in the bolder weights to improve legibility and achieve a certain elegance. FF Karbid Display is the most obvious spin-off of the original FF Karbid. More than merely having been assimilated, the letter forms were revised according to the new concept. The FF Karbid family has been augmented with two entirely new sub-families. The first one, the Text version, is intended for body copy in small sizes. The eccentric, serif-like swashes in select letters have been abandoned, while the friendly, lively forms of l, y, z and Z show the close relationship to the FF Karbid family. The other new sub-family is a Slab version. It has a sober, journalistic character, inspired by the typography in magazines of the 1920s (see Memphis, etc.). The strong serifs lend the typeface footing and an air of reliability. To improve legibility and balance the contrast was increased in comparison to the sans serif version.

Updated and extended FontFonts

FontFont continues its steady conversion of its library in Web & Office versions. This time FF Nexus and FF Signa Serif were released in both font formats.

Language extensions continue as well: FF Unit Pro speaks Cyrillic and Greek now.

FF Nexus Mix, FF Nexus Serif, FF Nexus Sans, FF Nexus Typewriter

FF Nexus

Ten years after his iconic FF Scala, Martin Majoor expanded his idea of “two typefaces; one form principle” into “three typefaces; one form principle.” The result: a new family of typefaces. FF Nexus borrows some of its structure from FF Scala, but adds the slab-like FF Nexus Mix and monospaced FF Nexus Typewriter to the set. The four coordinated families form a powerhouse type system, combining elegance with versatility. Web and office versions are now available.

FF Signa Serif

FF Signa is a typically Danish typeface by Ole Søndergaard, rooted in architectural lettering rather than book typography. Concise letterforms and a minimum of detail produce clear and harmonious word images. Designed for the Danish Design Center, it is used there for printed material and exhibitions as well as the internal signage system. There are Condensed, Extended and Correspondence versions, and in 2005 FF Signa Serif joined the family. Now the web and office versions are also available for FF Signa Serif.

FF Unit

FF Unit Showing

FF Unit was designed by Erik Spiekermann and produced by Christian Schwartz. FF Unit is the grown-up, no-nonsense sister of Spiekermann’s famous FF Meta. With FF Unit, puppy fat is off, some curves are gone and the shapes are tighter. While FF Meta has always been a little out-of-line and not exactly an over-engineered typeface, FF Unit is less outspoken and more disciplined. It is—like FF Meta—very suitable for use quite small and large, but FF Unit lacks some of the diagonal strokes and curves that give FF Meta its slight informality. However, FF Unit is not cold or uptight, just cool: no redundant ornamentation, just a lot of character. The tighter shapes make it suitable for big headlines set tight. Smaller sizes benefit from the increased contrast between vertical and horizontal strokes and open spacing. Thin and Light perform well set large, displaying the characters to their advantage. There is a great difference in weight between the Thin and Ultra, providing a good range of weights for contrasting combinations. Alternative characters (a, g, i, j, l, U, M) make for interesting headlines. The Small Caps are a bit larger than normal, making them suitable for abbreviations and acronyms. The many weights include old style, regular, and tabular figures. FF Unit Pro is now available with Cyrillic and Greek character sets. The entire FF Unit super family consists of FF Unit, FF Unit Slab, and FF Unit Rounded.

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New release: FF56

FontFont designers have been recipients of prestigious type design awards, but few can claim to have been even before their creations were officially published. Ludwig Übele’s FF Tundra — a recipient of a Certificate of Excellence in Type Design at this year’s TDC2 competition — is now available for licensing. Other new releases are Jörg Hemker’s versatile sans FF Sero; the informal cousin of the popular FF Mister K; a monospaced variant for FF Nuvo; and stencil versions for the Danish sans/serif type system FF Signa.

The new designs

FF Sero

FF Sero

FF SeroJörg Hemker’s versatile sans FF Sero combines the striking forms of an American grotesque with the legibility of a humanist sans serif typeface. It has open contours, a distinct x-height and a homogeneous grayscale value. During seven years of development the classic letter forms have matured into a balanced, sovereign typeface. Eight harmonized weights and an extensive character set allow for a flexible and versatile typography. Cyrillic and Greek characters provide an extended language support.

For a limited time, FF Sero Medium is available for free download in OT, Offc and Web formats. Download it on the Goodies page.

FF Tundra

FF Tundra

FF TundraLudwig Übele’s award-winning design FF Tundra is a narrow serif typeface with stressed forms and soft contours. The idea evolved from investigating how a narrow typeface should look for optimal readability. To avoid a fence-effect, FF Tundra emphasizes the horizontal line. Ludwig Übele combined strong serifs, flat shoulders (see n) and open but heavy endings (see a, e, c) with a moderate contrast to achieve a balanced, legible typeface with a certain softness and humanity. FF Tundra has been designed for continuous text, but is also suitable for magazines and headlines (especially the Extra Light) and will surely work in newspapers as well. The family consists of six weights from Extra Light to Bold, each with Italics and Small Caps and many OpenType layout features.

FF Mister K Informal

FF Mister K Informal

FF Mister K Informal – This new design by Julia Sysmäläinen is the latest offspring of the FF Mister K font family. It began in one of Kafka’s Quart Notebooks with handwritten texts that look astonishingly clear. The letter forms are carefully placed line after line but still reveal the author’s characteristic writing style. There is a simple explanation: These are final, rewritten texts. The first version — loaded with heavy editing and correction marks — can be found elsewhere in Kafka’s literary remains. The strong personality of FF Mister K is often appreciated, but some designers find it too unpredictable for down-to-earth target groups. So enriching the K Family with a clear, friendly looking member derived from Kafka’s stylistic repertoire seemed predestined by the users’ needs.

FF Nuvo Mono

FF Nuvo Mono

FF Nuvo MonoSiegfried Rückel expands his magazine typeface FF Nuvo with a monospaced variant for all weights, including Small Caps and Italics. This offers new options for traditional and unusual designs. The design retains its stroke endings with “chipped” corners, which make them appear soft when seen from a distance or in small point sizes, but reveal their peculiar forms at a closer look. However its x-height was lowered somewhat in comparison to FF Nuvo to emphasize FF Nuvo Mono’s typewriter character. The calligraphic touch in the characters a, g and y make this typeface stand out among other typewriter-like faces, as do the alternate characters for a, g, k, s and y, which add typographic versatility.

FF Signa Stencil/FF Signa Serif Stencil

FF Signa Stencil

FF Signa Stencil/FF Signa Serif StencilOle Søndergaard’s stencil faces can be used to produce actual stencils, but more often than not they are selected for their unique aesthetic. It is fascinating to see how separate “floating” fragments combine to form recognizable character shapes. The way those letters are cut up gives a stencil design its specific character. FF Signa — a typically Danish typeface — is rooted in architectural lettering rather than book typography. This sans serif of concise letter forms and a minimum of detail joined the growing collection of sans/serif type systems when the serif variant was added in 2005. Now both versions are available as stylish stencil designs.

Updated and extended FontFonts

FF Info

FF Info

FF Info Text, FF Info Display, FF Info Correspondence ProErik Spiekermann’s and Ole Schäfer’s FF Info Office is the typeface Erik Spiekermann himself feels should be more popular “because it works well on screen and is really cool but nobody has found it behind the larger FF Info Text and Display families.” It has been renamed FF Info Correspondence to avoid confusion with the Office font format. The complete FF Info family, one of the best wayfinding type systems, has now been upgraded to Pro language support and has been carefully fine-tuned.

FF Profile

FF Profile

FF ProfileMartin Wenzel’s FF Profile is one of the more beautiful humanist sans serifs in the FontFont library. This clear, uncluttered and attractive family based on the broad-nibbed pen was already available in OpenType Pro format. Its character set was expanded to include Greek.

New Offc and Web FontFonts

FF Dolores
FF Dolores (Tobias Frere-Jones)

FF Gothic
FF Gothic (Neville Brody)

FF Kipp
FF Kipp (Claudia Kipp)

FF OCR-F
FF OCR-F (Albert-Jan Pool)

FF Sari
FF Sari (Hans Reichel)

FF Utility
FF Utility (Lukas Schneider)

FF Zwo
FF Zwo (Jörg Hemker, Henning Krause)

FF Zwo Correspondence
FF Zwo Correspondence (Jörg Hemker, Henning Krause)

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New release: FF55

BERLIN, GERMANY, April 2011 – FSI FontShop International announced the latest additions to its award-winning FontFont® typeface library.

The new designs

FF SpinozaMax Phillips developed FF Spinoza over a period of eleven years. With the goal of readability in mind, Phillips named the typeface after 17th century rationalist and lens-grinder Baruch Spinoza, a man whose job it was to help people see clearly. The family is meant as an elegant workhorse, a classic text family with just enough individual character to hold its own in display sizes. It was inspired by mid-century German book faces like Trump Mediaeval and Aldus, and by the types of Nicolas Kis. The forms are narrow and economical, with open counters. The line is firm and distinct. It has strong thick strokes and serifs to help it grip the page. Its intended virtues are firmness, clarity and modesty.

FF Spinoza

Download the FF Spinoza specimen (PDF, 1.9 MB).

FF More — It’s easy to find sans serif typefaces with multiple widths and weights, but large serif families are much less common. The 30-font FF More fills this void. Five weights in each of Condensed, Regular, and Wide widths answer every need of publication design, from strong headlines to readable text and space-efficient information graphics. FF More’s sturdy serifs and gentle contrast withstand the rigors of magazine and newspaper design — retaining clarity despite size, background, or substrate.

Łukasz Dziedzic built FF More to work alongside FF Good, resulting in a powerhouse superfamily, versatile in both its function and aesthetic.

FF More

Download the FF More specimen (PDF, 5.4 MB).

Updated and extended FontFonts

FF Meta HebrewErik Spiekermann’s FF Meta is the foundation of the FontFont library, released at the label’s inception and still a signature of the brand. Its ancestor – PT55 (1985) – was conceived for the West German Post Office as a economical typeface for use at small point sizes, but once FF Meta was released to the public it was used for nearly everything, quickly becoming one of the most popular typefaces of the computer era. It has been called the “Helvetica of the ’90s”  – not because the two typefaces have anything aesthetically in common – but because FF Meta fulfills so well the needs of modern communication. Oded Ezer designed a Hebrew version for Book and Bold.

FF Meta Hebrew

FontFont Release 55 marks a distinctive milestone — the entire FF library is now available in OpenType, while PostScript formats have been retired.

In addition, more FontFont families were converted to the Offc format (e.g. FF Sanuk and FF Isonorm). An important improvement is that Small Caps are now bundled for Offc fonts — if a font has a Small Caps version it is sold together with its companion, heavily discounting the Small Caps font.

On the OpenType Pro front, FF Sanuk was extended to Pro, and the lightest weights of FF Meta Pro, FF Meta Condensed Offc Pro, and FF Signa Correspondence Pro all received Cyrillic upgrades.

New Web FontFonts

New Web FontFonts

Aside from the two new families, ten more popular FontFont families were converted to webfonts: FF Balance, FF Chambers Sans, FF Isonorm, FF Magda, FF Oxide, FF Pitu, FF QType Square, FF SanukFF Signa Correspondence and FF Tartine Script. Web FontFonts are optimized for use on web pages using the @font-face rule. This means websites can now display HTML text in fonts other than the handful of “web safe” options of yesteryear. Because HTML text is far more flexible and easier to update than an image, using Web FontFonts gives the user customized, dynamic type. Furthermore, branded typography on web pages can be found and indexed by search engines. Text is also more accessible to users with disabilities. And because it can be resized, copied, and edited by website visitors, webfonts allow for stylized interfaces, forms, and applications without relying on Flash or other hacks.

Learn more about our different formats here.

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New release: FF53

BERLIN, GERMANY, June 2010 – FSI FontShop International announced the latest additions to its award-winning FontFont® typeface library.

The new FontFonts

FF Amman came into existence as Yanone’s graduation project at Bauhaus University in Weimar, Germany. In late 2008, Yanone set out to Amman, the capital of Jordan, following an invitation by Ahmad Humeid from the local design and branding office Syntax. They were to re-brand the capital’s municipality in preparation of Amman’s centennial celebrations.

FF Amman Sans Pro

First and main part of Yanone’s diptychon »Amman The FFilm« about the making of the FF Amman typeface for Jordan’s capital on occasion of its centennial celebrations in 2009. 

Never officially commissioned as a custom typeface, it was rather a birthday present from Syntax and Yanone for Amman, and the perfect university graduation project for Yanone. In the end, the typeface with several typographic novelties has been widely used for all kinds of municipal services in Amman. The family consists of seven sans and four serif weights, each with their true Italics and both Latin and Arabic character sets. It is one of the largest bilingual families ever made, one of the few designed bilingually from scratch and the first containing true Arabic Italics.

FF DIN Round Pro

FF DIN Round — This welcome addition to FontFont’s most popular family brings a softness to FF DIN’s simplicity and industrial sterility. FF DIN Round is more than a “search-and-replace” rounded version of its predecessor. Albert-Jan Pool and his team redrew each letterform to maintain the structure of the original. This ensures FF DIN and FF DIN Round will work well together in logos, slogans, price tags, etc. as compatible parts of advertising campaigns and corporate identities.

FF DIN Round is not only a good companion to FF DIN, its smooth and friendly curves make it work on its own for branding strategies for family cars, bikes, household appliances, sportswear, shoes, or medical products. It’s also very legible on screen.

FF Suhmo Pro

FF Suhmo is inspired by classic Egyptian and typewriter fonts such as Courier and American Typewriter, which feature headline and text use. This impressive duality was Alex Rütten’s guideline for the concept of FF Suhmo. At the same time, many formal details were derived from the typical neon-lettering you can find on aged Italian restaurants in Germany. FF Suhmo has short ascenders and descenders and a generous x-height, making it a good choice for editorial design. It combines simplicity and functionality with playfulness, offering interesting details such as loops and swashes and a slight stroke contrast. Its varied details are unobtrusive in text sizes while developing character and sparkle in headlines.

FF Suhmo’s extensive character set includes numerous special characters and ligatures, several figure sets and small caps throughout all styles. The family consists of 4 weights: Light, Regular, Bold and Black, each with an Italic. The weights were staggered to complement each other within a layout, the Black corresponding to the Regular and the Light corresponding to the Bold weight, allowing words or phrases to be clearly stressed within a text. The Italics are lighter than the Roman and have a relatively slight angle of slope. The forms are derived from a manual writing process and often cross the base-line or the x-height.

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New release: FF51

BERLIN, GERMANY, December 2009 – FSI FontShop International announced the latest additions to its award-winning FontFont® typeface library.

The new FontFonts

FF Yoga Pro
FF Yoga Sans Pro

Xavier Dupré’s FF Yoga family is a type system conceived to work for newspapers and magazines thanks to its strong personality and good legibility. The Serif weights with their sturdy serifs are a good choice for body text, but they also serve as an original headline face with their subtly chiseled counters inspired by blackletters. FF Yoga mixes the harshness of blackletters with the balanced rhythm and round shapes of the Garalde typefaces. FF Yoga Sans is a contemporary alternative to Gill Sans and a sober companion to Yoga Serif.

FF Mister K Dingbats OT

FF Mister K Dingbats are the newcomers to Julia Sysmäläinen’s FF Mister K family, a script typeface based on Franz Kafka’s manuscripts. It started with Finnish illustrator Oili Kokkonen creating some pretty funny cartoon characters using letterforms of FF Mister K Regular. Soon after, the design of almost 600 pictograms was on its way. All are based on glyph parts of the Regular with which they make a very good match.

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New release: FF50

BERLIN, GERMANY, November 2009 – FSI FontShop International announced the latest additions to its award-winning FontFont® typeface library.

The new FontFonts

FF Mach

FF Mach The very first sketches of FF Mach were drawn in 2004 when a colleague who planned a new Polish magazine about culture and arts asked Łukasz Dziedzic for a logo – there was neither time nor money, so he did it quickly and for free. The logo was met with approval and Łukasz was asked for some sample covers and a few days later for the whole layout – again immediately and free of charge. Łukasz agreed with mixed feelings, thinking this might be a chance to use some of his fonts and even make a new one based on the logo and title graphics. The new font worked well but unfortunately, after the magazine failed three months later, it was never used again until Łukasz decided in 2008 to redraw all the glyphs in order to remove the traces of that speedy work, and in the end he designed a complete new type family with six weights and three widths.

FF Masala
FF Masala

FF Masala is as unctuous as a curry sauce with a hint of chili to add zest. Xavier Dupré’s initial idea for FF Masala was to offer a casual Sans matching FF Tartine Script. After rethinking and refining, FF Masala became a truly casual type system with three Sans weights and their Italics plus three powerful Script versions with swashes, right for logos and packaging as well as comics or children’s book covers.

FF DIN Italic

FF DIN® Condensed Italic — The FF DIN family has been completed by FF DIN Condensed Italic including Latin Extended and Cyrillic Extended characters.

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