News: Tagged as In-use

FF Mark In-Use: The Dash

Our next ‘In-Use’ case comes from a Kickstarter project for the worlds first wireless smart in-ear headphones known as The Dash. With the ability to hold a 1000 songs, built-in performance tracking and body sensors, The Dash looks to be the future in headphone technology.

As a kickstarter project the website is required to attract as much attention as possible, making the strong, bold and eye catching FF Mark the perfect typeface for drawing in potential investors.

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About FF Mark

FF Mark was designed by Hannes von DöhrenChristoph Koeberlin and the FontFont Type Department. Born from the idea to create an up-to-date typeface rooted in 1920s German geometry, the typeface is strong, simple and bold in form and at a glance may appear to be typical of its predecessors from the time.

FF Mark

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FF Ernestine In-Use: Venco Liquorice Packaging

FF Ernestine has come over all sweet in its latest ‘In-Use’ case as the chosen font for Venco liquorice packaging. Available in several different flavours and styles including sweet, salty, salmiak, soft or tough, these Dutch liquorice treats are perfect for anyone with a sweet tooth!

FF Ernestine was born from the search for a versatile monolinear text typeface whose design could encompass seemingly opposite feelings. Its designer Nina Stössinger wanted to develop a solution that would feel warm, but also serious; slightly feminine, but not too swirly-girly – charming and sturdy at the same time.  

FF Ernestine Venco

FF Ernestine

FF Ernestine

FF Ernestine

FF Ernestine

FF Ernestine

FF Ernestine

FF Ernestine

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FF Liant In-Use: Weleda packaging

WeledaThe next in our FontFont ‘In-Use’ series features natural cosmetic brand Weleda, which uses FF Liant across all of its packaging.

Weleda is a multinational company that produces both beauty products and naturopathic medicines. It is dedicated to using entirely 'natural' ingredients and none of their ingredients or products are tested on animals. The company also uses a green energy supplier and are passionate about education for their farmers and their communities. They also abide to fair trade practices and operate in five continents with 20 direct subsidiaries, partnerships in 53 countries, and close to 2,000 employees worldwide. 

FF Liant was originally designed for Weleda in 1976 by Ingrid Liche, with one of most notable characteristics being its lively lines, the forms for which are taken from nature, helping further embody the messaging behind the brand.

However in the early 1990s the company divided and gave up its brand name recognition giving Liche the opportunity to distribute FF Liant exclusively via FontFont. Since then she has re-digitized the font, adding several ligatures and expanding the face to a three weight family.

Weleda

Weleda

Weleda

Weleda

 

FF Liant Weleda

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FF Enzo In-Use: The New York Times Redesign Page

For our most recent ‘In-Use’ example we are excited to share the new web page from The New York Times, who have used one of our FontFonts for their redesign launch page.

Using the Scandinavian style FF Enzo, created by Tobias Kvant, the redesign page lists all of the new improved features of the highly popular news website, click the link to see the font in action: www.nytimes.com/redesign/For more images head over to the FontFont Behance page.

 

FF Enzo NYT

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Makers and Shakers – FF ThreeSix for Makr Shakr

Imagine a bar staffed by robots. Yes, robots are not unheard of, but it’s fair to say that three orange robotic arms that can mix and serve bespoke drinks in real-time classifies as impressive.

FFThreeSix MakrShakr

Cue in Makr Shakr. Unveiled at this year’s Google I/O conference, the fun, but serious installation and social experiment saw many a cocktail concoction crafted by three KUKA robots and delivered via a conveyor belt. And not to mention the elegant live digital tessellations of honeycombed data on-screen behind the “bar” and across mobile screens, keeping track of every shake and stir. People gathered with Makr Shakr app in hand, drinks were ordered, robots made and shaked.

The robotic bartending system was developed and designed by MIT Senseable Lab in collaboration with the Coca Cola Company and Bacardi Rums in partnership with Pentagram’s Eddie Opara and team, who were responsible for the identity, web application and data visualisation.

FFThreeSix MakrShakr

FFThreeSix MakrShakr

The design intent of the app was to match the agility of the robots, as well as the scientific, step-by-step process of assembling the drinks. Cue in FF ThreeSix. Paul McNeil and Hamish Muir’s experimental geometric yet optically balanced typeface embodies this sentiment visually and conceptually. On why it was chosen, Opara, lead Pentagram partner on the project explains – “It exudes technology and the future”.

FFThreeSix Makr Shakr

FFThreeSix MakrShakr 

FF ThreeSix is subtle and humanistic in an absurdly mathematical rigour. It has been sublimely applied as part of the Makr Shakr identity not just as an alphabet, but also shape and form. The beautiful lines, dots and sometimes blobs work seamlessly in large and small scales together with the organic and mechanical honeycomb system.

The beauty of the identity is not only in the conceptual execution, but is also in its application across the various platforms (desktop, web, app) and mediums (digital, motion, spatial). Opara and his team have played to the strengths of FF ThreeSix taking advantage of the distinguishing qualities between the various styles, mixing and matching them at different sizes and scales typographically and graphically.

FFThreeSix MakrShakr

The identity and application also demonstrates the versatility in the FontFont product offering and the benefit of having a library of typefaces available for multiple uses. The diversity in formats and licenses allows for more possibilities in application.

FFThreeSix Makr Shakr

Male, Female. Bourbon, white rum. Lemon, lime, orange peel, mint. Mojitos or old-fashioned. Whether it be recipe, ingredient, drink or drinker demographics, or even what was currently on-drink-trend, the identity and data was magnificently visualised and optimised for the app and large screen display.

Makr Shakr is a fine example of possibility and how a typeface can work holistically to transform an identity.

For more on the making and shaking of the project head to Pentagram’s website.

 

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FF Tundra takes a starring role in the newly redesigned ‘stern’

Newsstands in Germany have looked a little different since March 14, 2013 – the day the redesigned stern magazine premiered. A weekly news magazine, stern is one of the major journalistic publications serving the German-language market. Whenever a well-established brand changes its appearance, typography and typeface selection are two of the many factors to be considered. In this case, stern decided to use FF Tundra as its main text face. While this is just a small element of the magazine’s new guise, it plays the most essential part of its reading experience.

FF Tundra for stern magazine

The typography of the redesigned stern appears quite objective. A number of typefaces are used throughout its pages, but each font has a specific role to play. The magazine is printed on brilliant white paper, with most text being either black or red. Aside from FF Tundra, stern also uses Kris Sowersby’s Metric typeface. That family may be found in sub-headlines and image captions, for instance. A condensed sans serif with rounded corners, Soft Press by Patrick Griffin is used on the magazine’s cover and for the drop-caps at the start of articles. This has something of a woodtype poster feeling, but the letters’ rounded corners also tie into several currents common to contemporary digital design.

FF Tundra for stern magazine

The headlines for most of articles inside the magazine are set in Nimbus Roman by URW++. Like Metric, Nimbus helps root stern’s typography in a German graphic design tradition. It calls to mind the paperback covers designed by Willy Fleckhaus for the Suhrkamp publishing house in the 1970s.

FF Tundra for stern magazine

FF Tundra itself is a rather new creation. Designed for FontFont by Berlin-based Ludwig Übele in 2011, FF Tundra was intended for magazine-setting right from the drawing board. The principal tenant of its design is its stress on horizontal movement. FF Tundra’s letterforms are rather narrow, but their long, flat serifs seem to stretch them out somewhat. The curved elements of some letters have been simplified and flattened. This increases the size of the letters’ counterforms, which is a common method to improve legibility, as well as strengthening the horizontal-ness of the typeface. A pleasant effect of FF Tundra’s reinforcement of the horizontals is that its letters appear to push the reader’s eye forward across lines of text. 

Since FF Tundra is stern’s new text face, it appears throughout the magazine in just a single point size. The features of its family are however employed in full. FF Tundra’s Italic is used in articles when necessary, as is the Bold weight and the fonts’ oldstyle figures.

FF Tundra for stern magazine

As is common for European magazines of its kind, stern is printed on gravure presses, instead of with an offset lithography technique. Gravure printing really allows colour photographs to look their best, giving them more depth than offset presses typically would. stern uses a thin coated paper stock, like that seen in many gravure-printed magazines. While the combination of gravure printing and this stock are great for images, they can really kill text; offset printing allows text to be printed much more clearly and sharply. Designers specifying typefaces for gravure printing must be extra careful, and it is here where the decision to apply FF Tundra to the redesign really pays off. Despite all of the little dots that appear around each letter – a typical hallmark of gravure printing – the images of FF Tundra’s letters remain clean and readable.

FF Tundra for stern magazine

This redesign of stern was coordinated by the magazine’s editorial team and supported by the art director, Johannes Erler (a FontFont-designer in his own right), as well as by Luke Hayman from Pentagram’s New York office. Ludwig Übele also revised the new logotype for stern. We’d like to congratulate the stern design team on the successful stern redesign, and for selecting FF Tundra in the process.

Learn more about the redesign process on Pentagram’s website.

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Share your work and win a ticket to TYPO Berlin!

Have you used a FontFont in a recent project?

Would you like to win a ticket to TYPO Berlin?

As proud sponsors of this year’s TYPO Berlin, we are delighted to give away three tickets to the conference. With an all-star lineup including Ken Garland, Kate Moross, Jessica Walsh, Anthony Burrill and Albert-Jan Pool (designer of FF DIN), it is simply too good to miss!

TYPO Berlin Competition

How to enter

Just send us an example of FontFonts in use from a project that you have worked on recently and you will automatically be entered into our draw. Please send a link to your website or a PDF of your project with a brief description to news@fontfont.com.

Closing date 

11.00 (CET) Tuesday 30 April. We will announce the winners shortly after the closing date.

Good Luck!

*Please note the prize is just the ticket for the conference and not travel to Berlin, so you’ll have to make your own way there ;-)

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Best Collection FontFonts for Small Text

Think of small text, and often legalese, terms of use, credits, and tiny annoying instructions spring to mind. When working with the strict number of constraints that come with small text, it’s sometimes tricky to know where to start. So to help you weave your way through the world of small text, here are some tips and tricks and a roundup of our best Collection Tier FontFonts suitable for this slight but by no means insignificant intended use.

FF Bradlo Sans & FF Bradlo Slab

FF Bradlo

FF Elementa

FF Elementa

FF Schmalhans

FF Schmalhans

FF Plus Sans

FF Plus Sans

FF Sheriff

FF Sheriff

FF Parable

FF Parable

FF Roice

FF Roice

FF Instanter

FF Instanter

When it comes to small text, it’s the size of the letters within the available space that counts. To ensure optimal legibility simpler forms help. No parts of the text should disappear. Typefaces optimized for small sizes often have reduced stroke contrast; the thinner parts of the letters are almost as heavy as the thick bits. A high x-height can help, too – plus short ascenders and even shorter descenders. Letters themselves are often somewhat wider. If your typeface doesn’t already have generous letter spacing, add more tracking to your text!

It may be true that we read best what we read most. For years, much of the tiniest text appeared in dictionaries and newspaper classified ads; these were often set in serif faces. However, sans serifs perform well in this environment if they have large counters and open apertures – think about the traits in humanist sans types. Whatever typeface you pick, it should not be too fancy: small text leaves no room for detail.

Small text rarely appears alone – who wants to read a document where everything is tiny? Go for a selection that works well small, but also includes some contrast between its family’s weights: If you set some words in the middle of a line in bold, you won’t want this to go unnoticed to the reader. Think about how your selection combines stylistically with the larger type in the document, too.

Catch up on our previous intended use posts:

About our Collection Tier

Our Collection Tier FontFonts are a selection of cost-effective typographical treasures offered as full families. All packages are available in OpenType with Standard language support (with a few key exceptions) and are all affordably priced under €/$ 100 each.

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FF Dagny in-use: Fabulous new visual identity for fasett

New Year, new typeface! Our friends over at the Norwegian communications agency, fasett have completely revamped and relaunched their visual identity using one of our very own FontFonts, FF Dagny.

FF Dagny featured on fasett

We particularly love the About Us page ... Follow their gaze as you pass your mouse over each person.

About Us fasett 

The award-winning FF Dagny family has five weights, each with a companion italic. Designed by Örjan Nordling and Göran Söderström in 2009, it was awarded an ISTD International Typographic Award in 2011.

We’d love to feature your work

Have you used a FontFont in one of your projects recently? If so, we’d love to feature you! Just drop Lucy a line (lucy@fontfont.de) and she’ll be in touch.

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Best Collection FontFonts for festive occasions

For the past few months, we’ve brought together our favorite FontFonts from our Collection Tier and top tips for a particular intended use. With only a few days to go until we head off on our festive break, we couldn’t help but tackle the typographical heights of FontFonts suitable for festive occasions. So grab a mulled wine and a mince pie and feast your eyes on these festive fancies.

FF Quill

FF Quill

FF Danubia and FF Danubia Script

FF Danubia and FF Danubia Script

FF Nelio

FF Nelio

FF Elegie

FF Elegie

FF Letterine

FF Letterine

FF Eddie

FF Eddie

Showings and images by Angelo Stitz,
except FF Elegie: Image by Tobias Titz/
fStop (1009056)

 

Holidays and celebrations have a steady stock of traits to fall back on. These give you excellent opportunities to explore new script fonts, fat faces, or Old English types. Really, anything that looks traditional is likely to be a nice fit. You can also run wild with pastiche or kitsch – letters that look like they are made of candy canes, leaves, ribbons or snowflakes are fair game.

 

Type for festive occasions often takes the form of text to be looked at, rather than actually read. Don’t go the safe route and pick a face that looks too much like something for a book. Go ahead and let your type call attention to itself; there is no need to be too text-y.

 

Most important of all, be sure to pick something that feels cheerful; nothing brings down an invitation like a typeface that is too dreary or formal. Your fonts won’t be the only element of an upbeat design, either. Color will surely play a role, as will illustration or other imagery. Fonts with holiday ornaments can help in a pinch, too.

 

Catch up on our previous intended use posts:

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