News: Tagged as Hannes von Döhren

FF Mark In-Use: Appetite for Radical Change. Katowice 1865–2015.

In producing the Appetite for Radical Change exhibition, Medialab Katowice incorporated Hannes von Döhren, Christoph Koeberlin and the Type Department’s FF Mark into a work of stunning restraint. The project began as a series of lectures on the historical development of Katowice, Poland, a city known for its ability to—and even inclination toward—adaptation and change. Formally, the work is presented with iconic clarity. FF Mark’s geometric qualities are a good unifier in this regard, while its more human facets serve to invite participation by onlookers. From its companion site: “The exposition is devoid of the traditional historical narrative, which usually puts the focus on important historical figures, political events or wars. Instead, it uses diagrams, maps and data visualisations to illustrate the rapid transformations of Katowice. The city’s architecture plays an important role, showing the momentum and optimism of its creators, regardless of the period and political context.”

In keeping with the open culture that undertook the project, its creators make available many of the assets produced as part of the work, including an OpenType file containing monochromatic depictions of many of the city’s architectural landmarks.

Medialab Katowice is a collaborative environment for developing and executing culturally significant projects that make use of emerging technologies. The purpose for such collaborations are both social and educational, giving all who participate the chance to learn, mix, and refine their skills. 

 

Appetite for Radical Change. Katowice 1865–2015.Appetite for Radical Change. Katowice 1865–2015.Appetite for Radical Change. Katowice 1865–2015.Appetite for Radical Change. Katowice 1865–2015.

An interactive map that allows its participants to see patterns in the city’s growth over time http://katowickiebudynki.eu

Appetite for Radical Change. Katowice 1865–2015.Appetite for Radical Change. Katowice 1865–2015.Appetite for Radical Change. Katowice 1865–2015.Appetite for Radical Change. Katowice 1865–2015.Appetite for Radical Change. Katowice 1865–2015.Appetite for Radical Change. Katowice 1865–2015.Appetite for Radical Change. Katowice 1865–2015.Appetite for Radical Change. Katowice 1865–2015.Appetite for Radical Change. Katowice 1865–2015.Appetite for Radical Change. Katowice 1865–2015.Appetite for Radical Change. Katowice 1865–2015.Appetite for Radical Change. Katowice 1865–2015.Appetite for Radical Change. Katowice 1865–2015.Appetite for Radical Change. Katowice 1865–2015.

Photography by Medialab Katowice

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FF Mark and FF Quadraat in-use case: PAGE Magazine

PAGE

PAGE is one of the leading design publications in Germany for creatives and professionals in design, advertising and media.

Working in conjunction with the agencies digitalmobil and SQUIECH Design, the team has recently overhauled their online presence. Both their print and online publications have been set in FontFonts including FF Mark and FF Quadraat, bringing a fresh, contemporary yet timeless look to the brand. 

Combining the new with the old and with its roots firmly seated in 1920s German geometry, FF Mark has seen a meteoric rise since it’s release in 2013. Designed by Hannes von Döhren and Christoph Koeberlin, it was a special project initiated by Hannes and FontFont with input from Erik Spiekermann and the FontFont Type Department. Strong, simple and bold, and crafted with the utmost consideration and perfection (aka German Engineering), it is “ze Germanetric sans”. In the print magazine the headers are set in a variety of weights of FF Mark, whilst the whole website is set in FF Mark Web. 

In the print magazine the body text is also set in another famous FontFont — Fred Smeijers’s FF Quadraat. One of the earliest typefaces to join our library it has become a go-to choice for many editorial designers. 

You can view FF Mark in all it’s glory on our award-winning microsite ffmark.com and read more about the changes to PAGE (in German).

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Photos by Alex Roth

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Über FontFont FF Basic Gothic

Next up in our Über FontFont series is Hannes von Döhren and Livius F. Dietzel’s functional and versatile FF Basic Gothic. Released in 2010, Hannes and Livius took inspiration from the letterforms of Gill Sans and Antique Olive to come up with a sans serif that was optimized for maximum legibility. At first glance it has a strikingly stripped back appearance but on closer inspection the precise, refined curves and straight lines add a touch of finesse. 

Über FontFonts are typefaces that have been in demand the most during the last three months. 

FF Basic Gothic

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ISTD Awards 2014

ISTD Awards 2014

A couple of weeks ago, we were invited to attend the International Typographic Awards ceremony in Bexhill hosted by the International Society of Typographic Designers (ISTD). It was a record win for FontFont. Four of our newer typefaces, FF Ernestine by Nina Stössinger, FF Mark by Hannes von Döhren and Christoph Koeberlin, FF Quixo by Frank Grießhammer and FF Antithesis by Yanone, were all awarded a Certificate of Excellence.

The ISTD is an international society whose mission is to raise awareness and interest in all forms of typographic communication. Promoting typographic standards and excellence, their awards are one of the most highly sought after accolades in the industry. Huge congratulations to all our FontFont Designers! 

ISTD Awards 2014ISTD Awards 2014

FF Antithesis by Yanone – The smallest super family ever.

ISTD Awards 2014

FF Ernestine by Nina Stössinger – feminine, but not too girly – charming and sturdy at the same time.

ISTD Awards 2014

FF Mark by Hannes von Döhren and Christoph KoeberlinZe new Germanetric sans.ISTD Awards 2014

FF Quixo by Frank Grießhammeran onomatopoeic typographic exaggeration.

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FF Mark gets folded for a fictional Hungarian Guggenheim

We love it when students do something out of the ordinary with our fonts, just as Krisztián Lakosi and Richárd Lakosi have done with FF Mark.

This great reinterpretation of FF Mark features in a project that looks at the construction of a fictional Hungarian Guggenheim in Budapest whilst asking the question: How would it take shape in today’s Hungary?

During the three stages of the project, FF Mark is transformed into a folding alphabet, giving a whole new look to one of the most popular typefaces in the FontFont library.

Take a look at the whole project here.

FF Mark GuggenheimFF Mark Guggenheim

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About FF Mark

FF Mark is a self-initiated collaboration between Hannes von Döhren, FontFont’s very own Christoph Koeberlin, and the entire FontFont Type Department. With the creative support/input of no less than Erik Spiekermann, they designed this distinctive typeface. FF Mark is strong, simple and bold in form and at a glance may appear to be typical of its predecessors from the time. On closer inspection, letter shapes are wider, letter proportions are better balanced and the x-height is uncharacteristically “normal” or higher, which increases its versatility tremendously.

FFMark.com is the microsite alternative to a normal font sample for FF Mark, providing a greater insight into the capabilities and background of the typeface.


 

 

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FF Mark In-Use: Walter Gropius' “The Scope of Total Architecture”

FF Mark — “Ze Germanetric sans” has most recently been used in this beautiful reprint, by Przemek Dębowski and printed by Polish publishing house Karakter, of a collection of essays by the founder of the Bauhaus, Walter Gropius. Gropius’ “The Scope of Total Architecture” was originally written at a the time of an industrial boom during the early 20th Century, a time that bears a lot of influence on FF Mark — an up-to-date typeface rooted in 1920s German geometry. As a family that maintains the integrity of tradition but in a contemporary context, FF Mark is the ideal type partner to this collection of essays that are is still considered to be applicable to modern architecture today.

For these images and more head to the FontFont Behance page.

FF Mark Walter GropiusFF Mark Walter GropiusFF Mark Walter GropiusFF Mark Walter GropiusFF Mark Walter GropiusFF Mark Walter GropiusFF Mark Walter Gropius

About FF Mark

FF Mark is a self-initiated collaboration between Hannes von Döhren, FontFont’s very own Christoph Koeberlin, and the entire FontFont Type Department. With the creative support/input of no less than Erik Spiekermann, they designed this distinctive typeface. FF Mark is strong, simple and bold in form and at a glance may appear to be typical of its predecessors from the time. On closer inspection, letter shapes are wider, letter proportions are better balanced and the x-height is uncharacteristically “normal” or higher, which increases its versatility tremendously.

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FF Mark In-Use: The Dash

Our next ‘In-Use’ case comes from a Kickstarter project for the worlds first wireless smart in-ear headphones known as The Dash. With the ability to hold a 1000 songs, built-in performance tracking and body sensors, The Dash looks to be the future in headphone technology.

As a kickstarter project the website is required to attract as much attention as possible, making the strong, bold and eye catching FF Mark the perfect typeface for drawing in potential investors.

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About FF Mark

FF Mark was designed by Hannes von DöhrenChristoph Koeberlin and the FontFont Type Department. Born from the idea to create an up-to-date typeface rooted in 1920s German geometry, the typeface is strong, simple and bold in form and at a glance may appear to be typical of its predecessors from the time.

FF Mark

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Making of FFMark.com

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First sketches for the mobile version of FFMark.com
The CPU-intensive elements like the fullscreen video, live blur and the overlay feature were removed
in favour of a better perfomance on mobile devices.

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We are pleased to announce that the Type Directors Club (TDC) have given recognition to the FFMark.com microsite with a “Certificate of Typographic Excellence” in the TDC Communication Design competition.

Both FF Mark and FFMark.com were, in many respects, unique ventures in the history of FontFont with each case taking a contemporary approach on established classic ideas.

Whilst the new FF Mark was formed as a reinterpretation of a classic Geometric sans, FFmark.com was created as a modern design of a digital specimen. Created as part of the FF Mark release the idea behind the site was to replace a standard font sample with something deeper, more interactive, informative and playful.

Unlike a normal font sample FFMark.com provides a greater insight into the capabilities and background of FF Mark. Some of the key features on the site include:

- FreeFönt download
- A new way of comparing weights
- Interactive Type Sampler
- Interactive mockup generator: Test and preview the typeface across
  various different media formats and application
- A historical look into classic geometric sans

World-renowned type designer Hannes von Döhren worked together with FontFont’s Christoph Koeberlin and the FontFont Type Department to create the new typeface in October 2013.

From here they went on to work with FontFont’s marketing team, fronted by Alexander Roth, to design FFMark.com, utilising an analogue approach of sketches as opposed to designing straight into digital format.

Once the final sketches were complete only then was the final artwork digitalised and passed to the development wizard, Rob Meek who created the site over a period of two weeks.

The sketches below from the early stages of the site design represent only the inventory of elements and features without any serious attempts to design them at this stage and so should be viewed as neither beautiful, nor ugly but simply useful.

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Full screen video

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Realtime blur/unblur while scrolling

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Type tester

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Customisable background

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Character set overview

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Supported OpenType features

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Language support

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World clock adapts to day and night

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Weight overview

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Overlay all weights at once

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Compare weights

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Interactive mock-up generator

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Historical essay on geometric sans serifs

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Designer bios

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Study of possible positions for navigational elements and ideas for interaction with the FF Mark font on the microsite.

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Inventory of icons and their possible position.

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Navigation is crucial. It took a while until we came up with a satisfactory solution.

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Brainstorming about the interactive mock-up generator and the necessary elements to allow the user the best possible testing experience
 

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Thoughts on the functions of the mock-up chapter.

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Overview of the featured elements such as bookjacket, poster, website and a mobile device.

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The very first storyboard for the chapters of the microsite and their functions.

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Navigation and chapters.

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From the beginning it was clear that we wanted provide a powerful type tester which includes sliders for the font size and leading. As well as an image upload feature and a weight overlay functions to compare different individual weights or all at once.

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Thoughts on how to present the numeral sets aside from sober overviews.

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For people who are interested in using FF Mark on printed matter, a high quality downloadable PDF specimen was created. It provides an extensive overview of all weights and styles.

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The type tester is a very important feature on the FFMark.com microsite.
Therefore a lot of effort was invested to make it as good as possible for testing the FF Mark typeface.
 

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Ideas for the opening video.

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Storyboard for the opening video which was filmed by Max Zerrahn.

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New Release: FF 64

FF63 saw a FontFont milestone with the App+ license and this latest release is just as much an occasion as the last. With two brand new designs and Cyrillic language updates to three of our Pro packages, we have been counting down the days in high anticipation – we are simply super thrilled to bring you FF64.

New Designs

FF Mark

FF Mark

FFMark Showing

FF Mark Microsite

New meets old meets technic, FF Mark is more than just an average geometric sans. A special type project, Ze new Germanetric sans is a collaboration by Hannes von Döhren, Christoph Koeberlin, and the FontFont Type Department with creative support from Erik Spiekermann.

True to geometric tradition yet contemporary for today’s needs, the family of 10 weights ranging from Hairline to Black is designed with versatility in mind. Extreme weights have been engineered to shine bright in large sizes and middle weights optimized for body copy.

And to mark the launch of FF Mark, we are launching a new microsite to showcase and celebrate the thinking and creative process behind the typeface. Discover, interact with and download the exclusive Free Fönt at www.ffmark.com.

 

FF Kievit Slab

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Four years in the making and designed with utmost precision Mike Abbink and Paul van der Laan’s latest expansion of the FF Kievit superfamily has arrived.
The long-anticipated FF Kievit Slab has been carefully adjusted and fine-tuned in width and contrast to help make it an extremely robust and elegant typeface.

Much akin to its successful sisters, the new slab sibling comes in 9 weights from Thin to Black and matching italics, which makes it a perfect companion to other members of the FF Kievit family.

Typographical finesse has been delivered in the form of small caps, old style, lining, and tabular figures, and a mountain of OpenType glory.

The entire superfamily is well suited for editorial and book design, packaging and superfit for corporate branding and creative industries.

Language Extensions & Updates

Talk in even more type tongues with welcomed Cyrillic updates for FF Mister K Regular, FF Mister K Informal, FF Profile and FF Tisa Sans. Our extensive library also offer fonts for several scripts aside from Latin, including Greek, Arabic, Hebrew and even Armenian.

FF Mister K Regular Cyrillic

FFMisterKText Cyrillic

FF Mister K Informal Cyrillic

FFMisterKInformal Cyrillic

FF Profile Cyrillic

FFProfile Cyrillic

FF Tisa Sans Cyrillic

FFTisaSans Cyrillic

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Are you the next FontFont designer?

The stories and faces behind some of our FontFont Designers

Have you got a tremendous typeface design up your sleeve? At FontFont, we are driven by our love for type and typography and are always on the lookout for new typographical talent. When we started back in 1990, our mission was to create ‘fonts for designers by designers’. Since then, designers from across the world have contributed to our library. Twice a year, the TypeBoard, a committee of internal and external experts come together to review submissions.

Our submission policy continues to be as open as ever; we look for original designs and judge all submissions based on their aesthetic, technical and practical merits. If accepted your design will join the ranks of typographical triumphs such as FF Meta, FF Scala, FF DIN, FF Ernestine, and FF Tisa.

From the well-known to the newly discovered, our designers come from all walks of life. Here are the stories and experiences of three different FontFont designers, who have recently released their typefaces through us.

A lengthy love affair | FF Spinoza

Max PhillipsMax Phillips, a New York–based art director, illustrator, toy designer, and novelist (of the award winning ‘Fade to Blonde’), released his first ever typeface as a FontFont. His first beautiful typeface FF Spinoza was developed over a period (on and off) of eleven years. An elegant workhorse, FF Spinoza is a classic text family with individual character to hold its own in display sizes.

We asked Max what it was like to become a FontFont Designer:

‘Basically, I was asked to join a club whose members include Kris Sowersby, Tobias Frere-Jones, Akira Kobayashi, Jean-François Porchez, LeTeRror, Hannes von Döhren, Martin Majoor, Nick Shinn, Jeremy Tankard… the list goes on. And, of course, Neville Brody and Erik Spiekermann. It was the greatest honor of my professional life.’

When describing what it was like to work with FontFont, he said,

FF Spinoza

‘FontFont took tremendous pains with the work. When Andreas Frohloff returned his first edits on Spinoza, I was a bit dazed.  He’d altered almost every glyph in every font.  In some cases he'd clearly improved things.  In some cases I felt that he was correcting real problems, but that I wanted to correct them in my own way. Andreas was there to help. And that's the way things went. FontFont put a lot of work into Spinoza, but they left the final design decisions to me, even though I was a first-timer and they're the world's foremost independent foundry.’

Joining forces | FF Basic Gothic

Hannes von DöhrenIn contrast to Max, Hannes von Döhren has been designing typefaces for a number of years and set up his own foundry HVD Fonts in 2008. He became well known for his highly successful releases such as Brandon Grotesque, Brevia, Livory, ITC Chino, and Reklame Script. 

In 2010, working with Livius Dietzel, he joined forces with FontFont to release FF Basic Gothic.

FF Basic Gothic

‘On the one hand type design is all about creativity, optical decisions – the visual, but on the other hand there is a lot of engineering behind a font. Therein, I believe, lies the strength of FontFont. There are many type designers who would prefer to concentrate on the visual. FontFont takes over the visual and technical quality testing of font production and with that guarantees an high level of quality for their fonts.’

Fulfilling a FontFont dream | FF Ernestine

Nina StössingerNina Stössinger was also one of our designers who released her first ever commercial typeface design, FF Ernestine, through us. Having studied Multimedia Design and later Type Design, Nina set up her studio in Basel in 2008. Ernestine was born from the search for a versatile monoline text typeface; it's warm with a serious overtone, feminine with an underlying rigid assurance, above all it is charmingly sturdy. She first drew the Roman as a study project at the postgraduate Type Design programme in Zurich, and the Italic in dialogue with Hrant Papazian’s Armenian design.

When asked about what it was like working with FontFont she said:

FF Ernestine

‘To be honest, I have for a long time dreamed of one day not only designing a typeface, but releasing it through FontFont! Ambitious dreams – and I’m still amazed that they have actually come true. I am both proud and humbled to be part of this great library which in my perception sits right at the crossroads of relevance and innovation, utmost professionalism and agile freshness, trustworthiness and openness to experiment.’

Now it’s your turn …  

With the next TypeBoard happening on May 21, you still have time to submit your designs.

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