News: Tagged as FF Tisa Sans

Through the eyes of three FontFont Designers: The challenges of designing non-Latin typefaces

The Serebro Nabora type conference took place this past week in Moscow. In the spirit of the event and as part of our recent Cyrillic updates for FF Mister K, FF Mister K Informal, FF Profile and FF Tisa Sans we asked the designers of these typefaces, Mitja Miklavčič, Julia Sysmäläinen and Martin Wenzel, about their experience with non-Latin extensions, as well as the difficulties they faced in these design processes.

FontFont Cyriilics

Creativity and communication is always at the FontFont forefront along with the aim to build typeface collections with different styles and purposes. Cyrillic is one of the most used writing systems in the world and the alphabet has been adapted to write more than 50 languages. Of the many scripts in use around the world today, Cyrillic is probably the closest in appearance and structure to Latin, particularly in the case of upright typefaces. For Mitja Miklavčič, the design process was not significantly different compared with his Latin designs, as in the case of FF Tisa or FF Tisa Sans. “The italics were a bit more demanding to draw, and personally I always find kerning in Cyrillic a bit more challenging, too.”

FF Tisa Sans Cyrillic

FF Tisa Cyrillic

Mitja Miklavčič began the Cyrillic portion of FF Tisa while studying on the MA Type Design course at the University of Reading. “We had some Cyrillic specialists visiting the Department. My initial sketches there were done for the serif part of the FF Tisa family. Although they were over six years old, they were a helpful start for the FF Tisa Sans Cyrillic.”

In contrast to Cyrillic type, Cyrillic handwriting is more abundant in its form variety. Julia Sysmäläinen’s primary challenge while designing FF Mister K Cyrillic and FF Mister K Informal Cyrillic, was how to interpret handwriting typographically. “Like all kinds of handwriting, Cyrillic handwriting can be very expressive. I had to find solutions that suited Franz Kafka’s manuscripts, which were always written in German. For this I studied both historical and contemporary samples of Cyrillic handwriting, asked Russian friends and colleagues to produce samples – and of course, I made many myself. Before 1907, Kafka wrote in a German Kurrent script, and analyzing this was interesting, because some of the letterforms resemble Cyrillic characters. I also found a prominent Russian contemporary with a handwriting style that fits surprisingly well to Kafka’s.”

Julia Sysmäläinen had always planned to make a Cyrillic companion to FF Mister K. “Kafka was strongly attracted to Russia, and he admired Russian writers like Dostoyevsky, Tolstoy and Kropotkin. Soon after the release by FontFont, I made a limited Cyrillic version of FF Mister K Regular to submit to the International Design competition “Modern Cyrillic”, where it received a Certificate of Typographic Excellence. Later, I went at the design more thoroughly, creating extended Cyrillic character sets for both FF Mister K Regular and FF Mister K Informal.”

FF MisterK

FF Profile Cyrillic isn’t Martin Wenzel’s first endeavor into this writing system. “In 1992, FontFont asked me to draw a Cyrillic extension for my FF Marten typeface, which made me look closely at the script for the first time. The end result was no masterpiece, but still a good attempt to apply a simple modular concept to a different script. This was before I even studied Type and Communication Design at the Royal Academy in The Hague. With FF Profile’s Cyrillic, I talked with several designers about the script’s challenges in general, as well as specific letterforms. Over time I’ve consulted various books on the subject and completed my own calligraphic trials, which formed the basis for the structure of each glyph. If you can write it, you can draw it!”

FF Profile Cyrillic CharactersFF Profile Cyrillic

Like Martin Wenzel, Mitja Miklavčič also had professional experience designing Cyrillic typefaces. He has previously worked with noted specialists, such as Maxim Zhukov. “I grew up in the former Yugoslavia, so I learned Cyrillic in primary school. Serbian and Macedonian both use Cyrillic. That might also explain why I’ve decided to draw language-specific forms for those two languages as well. I always consult with any other designers, no matter what type of type design project I work on. A few colleagues have become close friends in the process.”

FF Tisa Sans is unique in that it not only includes support for Balkan languages that use the Cyrillic script, but also many Central Asian languages, like Turkmen and Kazakh as well, which are not frequently a part of many Cyrillic typefaces.

While Martin Wenzel and Mitja Miklavčič are not native readers of the Cyrillic script, Russian is Julia Sysmäläinen’s mother-tongue. “I’m the child of a Russian mother and a Finnish father, so I learned both languages during childhood. As a native reader, you grew up with all kinds of Cyrillic texts accompanying your everyday life, everything from shopping lists to letters, notebooks and advertisements. You get a pretty clear feeling of how far and where you can move away from some kind of norm, without your result looking awkward. If the script is new to you, you run the risk of being overcautious, or making naive mistakes.”

FF MisterK Cyrillic
In terms of OpenType features and character set size, the Cyrillics of FF Mister K are the most ambitious of FontFont’s new Cyrillic releases. “In Kafka’s manuscripts, readability was not a priority,” Julia Sysmäläinen mentions. “I carried this over into FF Mister K Regular as well. In its Cyrillic version, expressiveness and personality are paramount. Its style is easily readable for people who are at home in Russian and other languages with Cyrillic script, because context makes things clear, but it is not for learners of these languages. FF Mister K Informal Cyrillic is much easier to read, just like FF Mister K Informal’s Latin is. In Cyrillic handwriting some characters – especially д and т – can be written in various ways that do not really resemble one another; these forms can even be mixed within a single word.” This lively mixture is part of FF Mister K’s OpenType features, and it harmonizes well with Kafka’s turbulent manuscripts. FF Mister K Informal is more regularized, to stress readability.

As new communication methods continue to bring the world closer together, great typefaces have grown to speak for more languages and writing systems. FF Tisa SansFF Mister K and FF Profile join 30 other typeface families in the FontFont library with Cyrillic support, including FF Dax, FF DIN and FF Meta.

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New Release: FF 64

FF63 saw a FontFont milestone with the App+ license and this latest release is just as much an occasion as the last. With two brand new designs and Cyrillic language updates to three of our Pro packages, we have been counting down the days in high anticipation – we are simply super thrilled to bring you FF64.

New Designs

FF Mark

FF Mark

FFMark Showing

FF Mark Microsite

New meets old meets technic, FF Mark is more than just an average geometric sans. A special type project, Ze new Germanetric sans is a collaboration by Hannes von Döhren, Christoph Koeberlin, and the FontFont Type Department with creative support from Erik Spiekermann.

True to geometric tradition yet contemporary for today’s needs, the family of 10 weights ranging from Hairline to Black is designed with versatility in mind. Extreme weights have been engineered to shine bright in large sizes and middle weights optimized for body copy.

And to mark the launch of FF Mark, we are launching a new microsite to showcase and celebrate the thinking and creative process behind the typeface. Discover, interact with and download the exclusive Free Fönt at www.ffmark.com.

 

FF Kievit Slab

FFKievitSlab

FFKievitSlab Showing

Four years in the making and designed with utmost precision Mike Abbink and Paul van der Laan’s latest expansion of the FF Kievit superfamily has arrived.
The long-anticipated FF Kievit Slab has been carefully adjusted and fine-tuned in width and contrast to help make it an extremely robust and elegant typeface.

Much akin to its successful sisters, the new slab sibling comes in 9 weights from Thin to Black and matching italics, which makes it a perfect companion to other members of the FF Kievit family.

Typographical finesse has been delivered in the form of small caps, old style, lining, and tabular figures, and a mountain of OpenType glory.

The entire superfamily is well suited for editorial and book design, packaging and superfit for corporate branding and creative industries.

Language Extensions & Updates

Talk in even more type tongues with welcomed Cyrillic updates for FF Mister K Regular, FF Mister K Informal, FF Profile and FF Tisa Sans. Our extensive library also offer fonts for several scripts aside from Latin, including Greek, Arabic, Hebrew and even Armenian.

FF Mister K Regular Cyrillic

FFMisterKText Cyrillic

FF Mister K Informal Cyrillic

FFMisterKInformal Cyrillic

FF Profile Cyrillic

FFProfile Cyrillic

FF Tisa Sans Cyrillic

FFTisaSans Cyrillic

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Featured Web FontFonts, September 2013

We go green with FF Netto, inject a bit of FF Tisa Sans for culture, and touch on the discontent with FF Meta Serif in this month’s lineup of our favourite Web FontFonts in use.

The Green Building Converter – FF Netto

FF Netto_The Green Building Converter

More than half of the world's population live in major cities. Developed by Lend Lease, The Green Building Converter is a sustainability tool that takes users on an interactive journey allowing people to navigate and learn about green building development. Daniel Utz’s clean and rounded geometric FF Netto strikes the perfect typographic balance alongside the 3D diagrammatic pictorial renders and animations throughout the site and brand identity communications.

Jüdische Kulturage – FF Tisa Sans

FF Tisa Sans_Judische Kulturtage

Last week, Berlin hosted Jüdische Kulturtage 2013 (“Jewish Culture Days”), Germany’s largest festival of Jewish art and culture. The diverse programme of culture, music and literature features the four basic weights of Mitja Miklavčič’s FF Tisa Sans for headlines through to body copy across the site as well as festival collateral.

The Great Discontent – FF Meta Serif

FF Meta Serif_The Great Discontent

Designed and curated by Ryan and Tina Essmaker of Designing Monsters, The Great Discontent is a journal of interviews focusing on creativity, risk and what connects people as artists. A simple, clean, responsive and impeccably editorially considered site, the choice to use Erik Spiekermann, Christian Schwartz and Kris Sowersby’s FF Meta Serif as body is a great complement to “The Great Discontent”. 

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Featured Web FontFonts, March 2013

Back in February we celebrated the third birthday of our Web FontFonts – how time flies! This month’s round up of our favourite sites featuring Web FontFonts includes the highly popular FF Tisa family by Mitja Miklavčič, Max Phillips’ splendid FF Spinoza and Nina Stössinger’s charmingly sturdy FF Ernestine.

Typografie.info — FF Ernestine

Typografie set in FF Ernestine 

Typografie.info is the largest German-speaking online design platform all about type and typography and is set in Nina Stössinger’s delightfully feminine yet serious, FF Ernestine. Founded in 2001 by Ralf Herrmann, it’s a really active community with news articles and opportunities to share work and opinions.

Dave Dawson — FF Tisa and FF Tisa Sans

FF Tisa and FF Tisa Sans 

Dave Dawson is a Graphic Designer from Brooklyn in New York. His lovely site features Mitja Miklavčič’s versatile and super web-friendly FF Tisa Web and FF Tisa Sans Web in the body copy.

AQQ — FF Spinoza

AQQ set in FF Spinoza Web

The design collective AQQ sets their website in Max Phillips’ beautiful and sturdy workhorse, FF Spinoza. They make mainly furniture and are based in California. AQQ stands for “al que quiere” which when roughly translated from latin means “for he who wants it.”

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Communication Arts Awards for FF Tisa Sans, FF Scuba and FF Ernestine

What a way to start 2013! Three of our new FontFonts have been acknowledged in the prestigious Communication Arts Typographic Annual 2013.

Recognizing the great and the good in the world of typography, the latest annual is the third edition and was judged by three typographic experts: Gail Anderson, Jessica Hische and Jesse Ragan. With over 1900 entries to the competition, we were absolutely thrilled to hear that  FF ErnestineFF Scuba and FF Tisa Sans have each been honored best of the year in typeface design. With an acceptance rate of less than 10%, the Communication Arts Typography Competition is a major competition and inclusion is one of the most-coveted awards in the typographic industry.

FF Ernestine

FF Ernestine is the first commercial typeface designed by Nina Stössinger. Born out of the search for a versatile monoline text typeface, it is warm with a serious overtone, feminine with an underlying rigid assurance but above all charmingly sturdy. FF ScubaFelix Braden’s first release through FontFont is FF Scuba. The design combines constructed letters, like an almost rectangular o, with dynamic strokes and other written elements, giving the typeface a lively touch, while still keeping it true to its technical roots. FF Tisa SansLast year, the highly anticipated sans counterpart to Mitja Miklavčič’s popular FF Tisa arrived. FF Tisa Sans has a softer and friendlier feel compared to its serif sister. Whether paired with FF Tisa or used alone, FF Tisa Sans is a perfect choice for branding and editorial projects.

Previous FontFont winners of the Communication Arts Typographic Annual include:

  • Max Phillips’s elegant workhorse, FF Spinoza
  • Jörg Hemker’s matured and balanced, FF Sero
  • Łukasz Dziedzic’s sturdy serif superfamily, FF More
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Our top 10 most popular webfonts in-use

You may have heard that our Web FontFonts are now supported by 98% of all desktop browsers. With a tantalising typographical treasure trove of 2240 Web FontFonts, it’s sometimes tricky to decide which web font is the best fit for your online brand presence. To provide a little inspiration and help you choose, we’ve brought together a selection of in-use cases of our top ten most popular web fonts that have caught our eye recently. 

FF Meta & FF Meta Serif

Parse by HowThe marvellous FF Meta and FF Meta Serif, Erik Spiekermann’s No-Brainer, feature on this great site Parse by How. Parse is a real smörgåsbord of design content; they scour the web to bring together what they call design ‘tapas for the brain’. 

FF DIN

FF DIN in-use

One of our bestsellers and a real classic typeface, FF DIN, features on the Budget 4 Change website. The thin horizontal strokes and fluent curves of FF DIN provide a sober and solid tone to the site which is dedicated to mapping, tracking and analyzing donor government budgets against official development assistance.

FF Unit & FF Unit Slab

Typolution

Evolution, Revolution, Solution. That is the simple philosophy behind Typolution, the ‘purely’ typographical website that covers the latest developments, innovations and advancements in the industry (all in German). The site uses our very own FF Unit for the body text and FF Unit Slab for the headers, offering a cool yet disciplined tone.

FF Dax

Juventus Member

FF Dax adorns the official team fan page of the football club Juventus, the site is the go-to resource for Juventus fans to join the community of supporters and buy a subscription.

FF Scala & FF Scala Sans

VRB

The website for the VRB (Vorratsgesellschaft) organization based in Germany is set in one of the bestselling and most serious text faces, the formidable FF Scala and FF Scala Sans. The VRB offers ‘off the’ Shelf Companies and legal advice. 

FF Tisa & FF Tisa Sans

Espen Dreyer

Espen Dreyer is a Norwegian freelance photographer and his website packed full of lovely snapshots. Set in one of our most prolific Web FontFonts, FF Tisa and the recently released FF Tisa Sans

FF Kievit

Blossom

The new start-up Blossom, offers a brand new product management tool and features Mike Abbink’s FF Kievit which offers a clean and open touch to their site.

FF Clan

Red Bull Academy Radio

The website of the Red Bull Music Academy Radio really packs a punch with the use of the strong and powerful FF favorite, FF Clan which was designed by Łukasz Dziedzic.

FF Fago

Regmodharz

The mighty fine FF Fago, one of our super families designed by Ole Schäfer, provides a conscious corporate air to the online presence of the green energy project, RegModHarz.

FF Dagny

Two Arms Inc.

Two Arms Inc are a team of two, who combine illustration and design in a delightful manner. Based in Brooklyn they are famed for their passion for screenprinting. Their website employs FF Dagny, by Örjan Nordling and Göran Söderström. Great minds think alike, as we use it on our site too!

We’ve recently received some lovely examples of FontFonts in-use. Keep ’em coming! If you’ve used a FF in a recent project and you’d like to be featured on our site, please email lucy@fontfont.de.

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Win a ticket to TYPO London!

TYPO London

We are very excited to be sponsoring TYPO London and are delighted to be able to give you the chance to win one of three tickets to attend the two day conference.

Following in the footsteps of last year’s inaugural and highly successful TYPO London, this year’s conference will take place on 19th and 20th October at the Institute of Education.

The theme is Social and with the likes of Irma Boom, Paula Scher, Rian Hughes, Matthew Butterick, Tony Chambers to name a few, you will be spoilt for choice with the spectacular speakers and jam-packed programme on offer. Our very own Andreas Frohloff, Head of our Type Department, will also be running his much loved workshop on Calligraphy on the Saturday. 

The Competition

Three lucky people have the chance to win tickets to attend the two day conference*, all you have to do is answer the three following questions …

  • What was the name of the artist whose music we used in the FF Scuba video?
  • Can you name Mitja Miklavčič’s newest FontFont design?
  • Name the below FontFont tattoo (little tip … the answer's on the arm, wink wink, nudge nudge) Name this font

How to enter

Just email lucy@fontfont.de with your three answers and contact details.

Closing date: 11.00 (CET) Thursday October 11, 2012. We will announce the winners shortly after the closing date.

Good Luck!

*Please note the prize is just the ticket for the conference and not travel to London, so you’ll have to make your own way there ;-)

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Interview with Mitja Miklavčič on FontFeed

‘Whenever I design a typeface, I learn something new. This is one of the best things about typography.’

FF Tisa Sans

Over on the FontFeed there is an exclusive interview with Mitja Miklavčič on his newest design, FF Tisa Sans.

Read the interview in full.

About FF Tisa
FF Tisa Sans is Slovenian designer Mitja Miklavčič’s follow-up typeface to one of the new-millennium favorites in the our library, FF Tisa. Whether used together or separately, both of his families are excellent choices for branding projects and complex editorial applications.

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New release: FF59

It is with much anticipation and excitement that we announce our 59th release. With three brand new designs, one extension and a whole array of new Offc, Web and Pro versions of some of our classic FontFonts; FF 59 is one of our biggest releases yet.

The new designs

FF Scuba

FF Scuba

FF Scuba is a legible contemporary sans with a distinctive character. Searching for an offline companion for Verdana and not finding the exact tone he was looking for, designer Felix Braden set off to develop a new series of types. The resulting family is a bit tighter and more condensed than Verdana. In small sizes FF Scuba blends well with Verdana, and in display sizes it reveals its particular originality. The design combines constructed letters, like an almost rectangular o, with dynamic strokes and other elements referring to writing. This mix gives the typeface a lively touch, while still keeping true to its technical roots.

For a limited time, FF Scuba Regular is available for free download in OT and Web formats. Download it on the Goodies page.

FF Tisa Sans

FF Tisa Sans

FF Tisa Sans is Slovenian designer Mitja Miklavčič’s follow-up typeface to FF Tisa. Whether used together or separately, both of his families are excellent choices for branding projects and complex editorial applications. The original FF Tisa is one of the new-millennium favorites in the FontFont library—known for its sturdy and friendly forms, hence its common use in newspapers and magazines.

In all important details, FF Tisa Sans matches FF Tisa perfectly. Aside from the lack of serifs, the Sans features slightly reduced ink traps. Necessary system elements have been fine-tuned to one another, including  the color density of blocks of text, the proportions of the letterforms and their distinctive stroke endings, and even the eye-catching Italics. Of course, the FF Tisa Sans character set contains the same range of characters and typographic features as the original FF Tisa, too. Since FF Tisa Sans should prove quite suitable for signage and information design projects, Miklavčič included a range of specially designed arrows in each font as well.

FF Chartwell

FF Chartwell

Designed by Travis Kochel, FF Chartwell is a fantastic typeface for creating simple graphs. Driven by the frustration of creating graphs within design applications and inspired by typefaces such as FF Beowolf and ­­FF PicLig, Travis saw an opportunity to take advantage of OpenType technology to simplify the process.

FF Chartwell (Pies, Lines, Bars) was originally released in 2011 under the TK Type foundry. In 2012, it was added to the FontFont library with the addition of four new chart styles, the ­­ Polar Series as well as Bars Vertical.

The Polar Series (Rose, Rings, and Radar) is a set of new designs, which take on the form of more experimental charts. In an effort to make the charts smarter and more dynamic, each design reacts not only to the data entered, but the number of values.

Find out how to use FF Chartwell and download the User Manual.

Updated and extended FontFonts

FF Meta Serif: Light and Extra Bold

 

FF Meta Serif

Following the Greek/Cyrillic language update to FF Meta Serif in FF 58, we’ve now added two new weights to FF Meta Serif—Light and Extra Bold.

New Pro versions

Pro FontFonts enjoy the distinction of extended language support and ease of use, affording the typographer the ability to set text in a much broader range of languages. All Pro FontFonts include Extended Latin (Central European) characters, but may additionally support Cyrillic, Greek, or other/additional scripts. The following FontFonts now include Pro language support and thus speaking 36 Latin-based languages more.

FF Blur

FF Blur Pro by Neville Brody

FF Legato

FF Legato Pro by Evert Bloemsma

FF Magda Clean

FF Magda Clean Pro by Cornel Windlin, Critzla and Henning Krause

FF Market

FF Market Pro by H. A. Simon

FF Max Demi Serif

FF Max Demi Serif Pro by Morten Olsen

FF Meta Headline

FF Meta Headline Pro by Erik SpiekermannChristian Schwartz and Josh Darden 

FF Prater

FF Prater Pro by Henning Wagenbreth  and Steffen Sauerteig

FF Quadraat and FF Quadraat Sans Mono

FF Quadraat Display Pro & FF Quadraat Sans Mono by Fred Smeijers 

FF Schulbuch

FF Schulbuch Pro by Just van Rossum

FF Strada & FF Strada Condensed

FF Strada Pro & FF Strada Condensed Pro by Albert Pinggera

New Office and Web FontFonts

We are continually updating our library to ensure that our FontFonts are in the most up to date and useable formats. With our latest release, we’ve updated a whole host of our portfolio for the use on the web, among them classics such as FF Strada, FF Legato, FF Transit, and FF Schulbuch.

All these faces additionally come in Offc versions, fonts tuned to work best in programs like Microsoft Word or PowerPoint.

FF Blur

FF Blur Offc Pro/Web Pro by Neville Brody

FF Eureka, FF Eureka Sans & FF Eureka Sans Condensed

FF Eureka Offc Pro/Web Pro, FF Eureka Sans Offc Pro/Web Pro and FF Eureka Sans Condensed Offc Pro/Web Pro by Peter Biľak

FF Fago Correspondence

FF Fago Correspondence Sans Offc Pro/Web Pro and FF Fago Correspondence Serif Offc Pro/Web Pro by Ole Schäfer and Andreas Eigendorf

FF Legato

FF Legato Offc Pro/Web Pro by Evert Bloemsma

FF Magda Clean

FF Magda Clean Offc Pro/Web Pro by Cornel Windlin, Critzla and Henning Krause

FF Market

FF Market Offc Pro/Web Pro by H. A. Simon

FF Max & FF Max Demi Serif

FF Max Offc Pro/Web Pro & FF Max Demi Serif Offc Pro/Web Pro by Morten Olsen

FF Meta Headline

FF Meta Headline Offc Pro/Web Pro by Erik SpiekermannChristian SchwartzJosh Darden 

FF Prater

FF Prater Offc Pro/Web Pro by Henning WagenbrethSteffen Sauerteig

FF Quadraat and FF Quadraat Sans Mono

FF Quadraat Display Offc Pro/Web Pro & FF Quadraat Sans Mono by Fred Smeijers 

FF Schulbuch

FF Schulbuch Offc Pro/Web Pro by Just van Rossum

FF Seria & FF Seria Sans

FF Seria Offc Pro/Web Pro & FF Seria Sans Off Pro/Web Pro by Martin Majoor

FF Strada & FF Strada Condensed

FF Strada Offc Pro/Web Pro & FF Strada Condensed Offc Pro/Web Pro by Albert Pinggera 

FF Transit

FF Transit Offc Pro/Web Pro by MetaDesign

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