News: Tagged as FF Schmalhans

Best Collection FontFonts for Editorial and Publishing

Next up in our Collection FontFonts series we present our ‘Best Collection FontFonts for Editorial and Publishing’. Whether you’re looking for a fantastic font for your next bestselling book or a terrific typeface to match your message, here’s a look at our favorite Collection FontFonts for Editorial and Publishing and some hints and tips.

FF Handwriter and FF Beowolf

FF Handwriter and FF Beowolf

FF Holmen

FF Holmen

FF Extra and FF Typeface Four

FF Extra and FF Typeface Four

FF Rattlescript

FF Rattlescript

FF Wunderlich and FF Pitu and FF Stealth

FF Wunderlich and FF Pitu

FF Routes and FF Schmalhans

FF Route and FF Schmalhans

FF Mach and FF BeoSans

FF Mach and FF Beo Sans

FF Acanthus

FF Acantus

Typefaces used in editorial design typically call attention to themselves, but they should not appear so individual that they overpower the message of the text. The selections that you make will become the voice of your publication: this is your opportunity to be unique.

When it comes to editorial design and publishing, design work is usually done on a tight deadline. Your publication’s designers probably work in a larger layout team. Everyone on board needs to be able to make do with the typefaces they have at hand, so be sure to make selections that will provide them versatility, right off the bat. Larger families with many weights and widths are a good start. If you don’t want to pick a superfamily, consider serif and sans serif typefaces that can combine well together on the same page.

In this area of graphic design, designers have the freedom to pick type that is a little more elegant than in many other applications. Remember what makes a typeface appear classic – this could be a great time to look through selections with ‘low’ x-heights, especially if your page layout has room for text with long ascenders and descenders. There are many different kinds of serifs, too. Take the opportunity to pick one whose form matches your message, be it elegant, sharp or soft.

Catch up on our previous intended use posts:

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Best Collection FontFonts for Small Text

Think of small text, and often legalese, terms of use, credits, and tiny annoying instructions spring to mind. When working with the strict number of constraints that come with small text, it’s sometimes tricky to know where to start. So to help you weave your way through the world of small text, here are some tips and tricks and a roundup of our best Collection Tier FontFonts suitable for this slight but by no means insignificant intended use.

FF Bradlo Sans & FF Bradlo Slab

FF Bradlo

FF Elementa

FF Elementa

FF Schmalhans

FF Schmalhans

FF Plus Sans

FF Plus Sans

FF Sheriff

FF Sheriff

FF Parable

FF Parable

FF Roice

FF Roice

FF Instanter

FF Instanter

When it comes to small text, it’s the size of the letters within the available space that counts. To ensure optimal legibility simpler forms help. No parts of the text should disappear. Typefaces optimized for small sizes often have reduced stroke contrast; the thinner parts of the letters are almost as heavy as the thick bits. A high x-height can help, too – plus short ascenders and even shorter descenders. Letters themselves are often somewhat wider. If your typeface doesn’t already have generous letter spacing, add more tracking to your text!

It may be true that we read best what we read most. For years, much of the tiniest text appeared in dictionaries and newspaper classified ads; these were often set in serif faces. However, sans serifs perform well in this environment if they have large counters and open apertures – think about the traits in humanist sans types. Whatever typeface you pick, it should not be too fancy: small text leaves no room for detail.

Small text rarely appears alone – who wants to read a document where everything is tiny? Go for a selection that works well small, but also includes some contrast between its family’s weights: If you set some words in the middle of a line in bold, you won’t want this to go unnoticed to the reader. Think about how your selection combines stylistically with the larger type in the document, too.

Catch up on our previous intended use posts:

About our Collection Tier

Our Collection Tier FontFonts are a selection of cost-effective typographical treasures offered as full families. All packages are available in OpenType with Standard language support (with a few key exceptions) and are all affordably priced under €/$ 100 each.

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Faces and characters in our Type Department

 Our Type Department
The FontFont Type Department (l-r: Jens, Andreas, Inka, Christoph)

Have you ever wanted to find out about the faces and characters in our Type Department? In January, for our ‘Not Quite An Annual Report’ we interviewed Andreas, Christoph, Inka and Jens, to find out about their favorite FontFonts, their taste in music and what their biggest challenges last year were. Here’s the interview in full.

Andreas Frohloff | Head of Type Department

  • If you were a FontFont which one would you be and why?

FF Amman because the family is well designed in the sense that it’s not so digital smooth and glossy. The characters of the fonts have character :)

FF Amman

  • What’s your favorite music?

I like a broad range of music e.g. Jethro Tull, Neil Young, Keb’ Mo’ or Norah Jones …

  • What was the biggest challenge for you in 2011?

The biggest challenge was to successfully perform the calligraphy workshops at TYPO London.

Inka Strotmann | Chief Font Technician

  • If you were a FontFont which one would you be and why?

I would be FF Schmalhans Bold. FF Schmalhans is a very condensed typeface with a large x-height and was first drawn in the 70s. Like me, I was born in the 70s. I have wide legs, I am not really fat but I am broad in the beam so I look like condensed bold. Schmalhans is very clear and I am also very straight in the things I like to do.

FF Schmalhans

  • What’s your favorite music?

My favorite band is, for over 20 years now, Current 93.

  • What was the biggest challenge for you in 2011?

I had to draw my first uppercase German double s. It will be interesting to see if this glyph will be used and which form will be the favorite.

My big private event in this year was my first individual time trial. I trained a lot with my triathlon bike to achieve a good result and I was very happy with my time at the end.

Christoph Koeberlin | Font Technician

  • If you were a FontFont which one would you be and why?

FF Quadraat Sans SC Web Pro Condensed Extralight Italic, DirectWrite rendered at 31 px—for obvious reasons!

FF Quadraat Sans

  • What’s your favorite music?

Gebrüder Marx, currently.

  • What was the biggest challenge for you in 2011?

Answering these questions!

Jens Kutilek | Font Technician

  • If you were a FontFont which one would you be and why?

I actually had to ask my wife about this, it’s always hard to compare yourself to something like a typeface … I would be FF Spinoza. At first sight, it looks quite sober and not very fancy, but once you get to know it better, you will discover interesting details and how it can take you a long way. I’m also more book than display type. FF Spinoza

  • What’s your favorite music?

My all-time favorite band has to be The Magnetic Fields, for their stylistic experiments and unparalleled lyrical wit. Earlier this year I kept listening to the various Johnny Cash concerts recorded in prisons. It was fascinating how different the atmosphere and performances were between them.

  • What was the biggest challenge for you in 2011?

To move into a new flat. I had completely forgotten how time-consuming and work-intensive that was.

To see the team in action, check out the following video:

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Hans Reichel 1949–2011

Hans Reichel
Photo: Marc Eckardt

The Wuppertal musician, instrument builder, graphic designer and type designer Hans Reichel suddenly and unexpectedly passed away in his studio last Tuesday. Designers and typographers know him as the creator of the popular Barmeno and the world-renowned FF Dax family. Other type designs by Reichel are FF Daxline, FF Sari, FF Schmalhans, and FF Routes.

Hans Reichel appeared on the type scene with his first design Barmeno, an idiosyncratic sans serif released in 1983 by Berthold. He would revisit this concept of a rounded spurless design in 1999 with FF Sari. Expanding on his original ideas he devised a more versatile and complete interpretation, with a wider range of weights and a comprehensive character set.

Although Barmeno and FF Sari enjoyed seizable success, Hans Reichel’s real breakthrough as a type designer came with the typographic powerhouse FF Dax. Slightly more angular and systematic than its predecessor, this immensely popular type family has become arguably one of the most used advertising faces worldwide since its release fifteen years ago. The FF Dax family was gradually augmented with compact, condensed and wide versions, and italics for all variants.

Also FF Dax was subsequently revisited. Seeing Akira Kobayashi’s lecture about Adrian Frutiger’s Avenir Next at TYPO Berlin 2004 inspired Hans Reichel to start working on FF Daxline. The improved proportions and decreased stress make it better suited for text use. Personally Reichel thought FF Daxline to be the better typeface – it is clearer, airier and more versatile. Reichel toyed with the idea of creating a condensed version, but wasn’t sure if he’d still be able to swing it at his “retirement age”. Sadly, now we will never know.

Through the music he created, through the instruments he built, and through the typefaces he designed Hans Reichel shone as a fiercely original voice. With the disappearance of this multitalented maverick artist the type and music world is left a little poorer, a little less wondrous.

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New release: FF45

Each FontFont release is newsworthy in its own right, but there is something especially momentous about this one: four brand new families, each one very different from the others; new styles for three of our most popular typefaces; and a dozen expertly crafted OpenType releases that breathe new life into FontFont classics.

FontFont Release 45

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