News: Tagged as FF Prater

What Can Layer FontFonts Do?

Type is typically one-color. Of course, after it’s set, a user can manipulate letters with a texture or a gradient; but out of the box, a font is usually capable of a single color. This is where layer fonts change the game. With glyphs that are designed to be overlaid on top of each other, layer fonts make it easy to apply multiple colors and other effects without extra steps or leaving the comfort of your typesetting or layout app.


Layer_Hero_FF_Identification

 

Multi-layered type is not a new concept. “Chromatic” wood fonts for printing large headlines in two or more colors were common way back in the mid-1800s. Polychromatic type continued to be readily available in the photocompositing era when graphic designers sent their text to specialized typesetters to do the precision work required to line up the layers. When digital type took over, there was a noticeable lull in layered type. There were few chromatic fonts available, and making them work was now the complicated and tedious task of the designer who was suddenly given the additional role of typesetter.

But now, thanks to new typefaces (and rediscovering some old ones), better software, and time-saving tricks made possible by OpenType, chromatic type is back! Just a casual glance at graphic design blogs or Pinterest boards is enough to see that layer fonts are in fashion again.

There are plenty of interesting and useful multi-layer typefaces in the FontFont library — it may surprise you to learn we have more than 50 families with layering capabilities (even some Free FontFonts like FF Pullman and FF Koko) — but they are often overlooked because online samplers are optimized for standard, single-layer type. So let’s take a closer, multicolor look at a few and see what they can do.

What Can Layer FontFonts Do?
Make things pretty.

The most obvious use of type layers is to add decorative elements in multiple hues. A variety of FontFonts take advantage of layers to enhance their display qualities, from playful to grungy. Here are a few:

Layer FontFonts 
FF Beadmap, FF Minimum, FF Letterine, and FF Flava demonstrate the coloring possibilities of FontFonts with layers.

What Can Layer FontFonts Do?
Add depth and dimension.

FF Profile Layers 

One of the more powerful benefits of layers is transforming type from an element that simply sits on a surface to one that has a three-dimensional shape of its own. A single layer font with built-in shadows or faceting can only go so far in simulating depth. With a layer FontFont like FF Primary you can use color to give each surface an appropriate shade, making the type pop off the page or recede into stone. Over at the FontShop blog, David Sudweeks wrote a good tutorial on using FF Primary (and most other layer fonts).

What Can Layer FontFonts Do?
Add realism. 

FF Kipp Layers

FF Kipp, inspired by a worn set of wood type, is one of the most popular typefaces with a rough, weathered contour. Still, users often overlook its layer variations which can make it an even more convincing emulation of imperfectly printed or painted letters. The extra fonts in the set offer a variety of degradation when overlaid over the base fonts. These extras can also be colored slightly different than the bottom layer resulting in an uneven, painterly effect.

What Can Layer FontFonts Do?
Give text meaning.

FF MisterK Features

Layers aren’t only useful for visual appeal. Among the many smart tricks in FF Mister K are scribble, strikeout, and underline features that can enhance the meaning of text all while staying true to the informal handwritten aesthetic of the typeface. The OpenType-powered annotations are easy to apply, work with words of various lengths, and of course offer the ability to easily adjust coloring. Read more about how to use FF Mister K’s special effects in this info guide.

What Can Layer FontFonts Do?
Clarify text.

FF Jigger Overlays

One of the graphic designer’s often encountered but seldom discussed challenges is overlaying readable type on a photograph or video. This is particularly tricky when the background has varying values of light and dark. Common hacks include drop shadows and strips of color, but it’s often more engaging when the element backing the type is in harmony with the typeface. This is where FF Jigger shines. Because there are separate fonts for front and back, each can be colored independently. And because it’s type, changes to content or color are easy to make.

What Can Layer FontFonts Do?
Simplify iconography. 

FF Dingbats2 layering

Maps, infographics, UI design, and wayfinding systems ask a lot of iconography. To get the work done efficiently, icons must be easy to apply, easy to edit, and easy to change. That’s why working with symbol fonts makes so much sense. FF Netto Icons and FF Dingbats 2.0 offer frames and backgrounds to enable icon customization. Because these icon and border elements are separate characters they can each be colored separately. In FF Netto, key in the desired frame, apply its color, then key in an icon to align it perfectly inside the frame. FF Dingbats 2.0 uses an OpenType-powered layering feature to allow coloring of multiple elements in each pictogram without switching fonts (see above). Read more about this and the packages other features at the official FF Dingbats 2.0 site.

Using Layer FontFonts on the Web

You don’t need to limit your layer typography to print and images. Our friends at Typekit have written a simple CSS tutorial on using layer fonts in web design. For his article, Tim Brown demonstrates a chromatic typeface revived from the wood type era, but the technique will work with Web FontFonts like FF Prater Block, FF Advert Rough and parts of FF ThreeSix too.

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New release: FF59

It is with much anticipation and excitement that we announce our 59th release. With three brand new designs, one extension and a whole array of new Offc, Web and Pro versions of some of our classic FontFonts; FF 59 is one of our biggest releases yet.

The new designs

FF Scuba

FF Scuba

FF Scuba is a legible contemporary sans with a distinctive character. Searching for an offline companion for Verdana and not finding the exact tone he was looking for, designer Felix Braden set off to develop a new series of types. The resulting family is a bit tighter and more condensed than Verdana. In small sizes FF Scuba blends well with Verdana, and in display sizes it reveals its particular originality. The design combines constructed letters, like an almost rectangular o, with dynamic strokes and other elements referring to writing. This mix gives the typeface a lively touch, while still keeping true to its technical roots.

For a limited time, FF Scuba Regular is available for free download in OT and Web formats. Download it on the Goodies page.

FF Tisa Sans

FF Tisa Sans

FF Tisa Sans is Slovenian designer Mitja Miklavčič’s follow-up typeface to FF Tisa. Whether used together or separately, both of his families are excellent choices for branding projects and complex editorial applications. The original FF Tisa is one of the new-millennium favorites in the FontFont library—known for its sturdy and friendly forms, hence its common use in newspapers and magazines.

In all important details, FF Tisa Sans matches FF Tisa perfectly. Aside from the lack of serifs, the Sans features slightly reduced ink traps. Necessary system elements have been fine-tuned to one another, including  the color density of blocks of text, the proportions of the letterforms and their distinctive stroke endings, and even the eye-catching Italics. Of course, the FF Tisa Sans character set contains the same range of characters and typographic features as the original FF Tisa, too. Since FF Tisa Sans should prove quite suitable for signage and information design projects, Miklavčič included a range of specially designed arrows in each font as well.

FF Chartwell

FF Chartwell

Designed by Travis Kochel, FF Chartwell is a fantastic typeface for creating simple graphs. Driven by the frustration of creating graphs within design applications and inspired by typefaces such as FF Beowolf and ­­FF PicLig, Travis saw an opportunity to take advantage of OpenType technology to simplify the process.

FF Chartwell (Pies, Lines, Bars) was originally released in 2011 under the TK Type foundry. In 2012, it was added to the FontFont library with the addition of four new chart styles, the ­­ Polar Series as well as Bars Vertical.

The Polar Series (Rose, Rings, and Radar) is a set of new designs, which take on the form of more experimental charts. In an effort to make the charts smarter and more dynamic, each design reacts not only to the data entered, but the number of values.

Find out how to use FF Chartwell and download the User Manual.

Updated and extended FontFonts

FF Meta Serif: Light and Extra Bold

 

FF Meta Serif

Following the Greek/Cyrillic language update to FF Meta Serif in FF 58, we’ve now added two new weights to FF Meta Serif—Light and Extra Bold.

New Pro versions

Pro FontFonts enjoy the distinction of extended language support and ease of use, affording the typographer the ability to set text in a much broader range of languages. All Pro FontFonts include Extended Latin (Central European) characters, but may additionally support Cyrillic, Greek, or other/additional scripts. The following FontFonts now include Pro language support and thus speaking 36 Latin-based languages more.

FF Blur

FF Blur Pro by Neville Brody

FF Legato

FF Legato Pro by Evert Bloemsma

FF Magda Clean

FF Magda Clean Pro by Cornel Windlin, Critzla and Henning Krause

FF Market

FF Market Pro by H. A. Simon

FF Max Demi Serif

FF Max Demi Serif Pro by Morten Olsen

FF Meta Headline

FF Meta Headline Pro by Erik SpiekermannChristian Schwartz and Josh Darden 

FF Prater

FF Prater Pro by Henning Wagenbreth  and Steffen Sauerteig

FF Quadraat and FF Quadraat Sans Mono

FF Quadraat Display Pro & FF Quadraat Sans Mono by Fred Smeijers 

FF Schulbuch

FF Schulbuch Pro by Just van Rossum

FF Strada & FF Strada Condensed

FF Strada Pro & FF Strada Condensed Pro by Albert Pinggera

New Office and Web FontFonts

We are continually updating our library to ensure that our FontFonts are in the most up to date and useable formats. With our latest release, we’ve updated a whole host of our portfolio for the use on the web, among them classics such as FF Strada, FF Legato, FF Transit, and FF Schulbuch.

All these faces additionally come in Offc versions, fonts tuned to work best in programs like Microsoft Word or PowerPoint.

FF Blur

FF Blur Offc Pro/Web Pro by Neville Brody

FF Eureka, FF Eureka Sans & FF Eureka Sans Condensed

FF Eureka Offc Pro/Web Pro, FF Eureka Sans Offc Pro/Web Pro and FF Eureka Sans Condensed Offc Pro/Web Pro by Peter Biľak

FF Fago Correspondence

FF Fago Correspondence Sans Offc Pro/Web Pro and FF Fago Correspondence Serif Offc Pro/Web Pro by Ole Schäfer and Andreas Eigendorf

FF Legato

FF Legato Offc Pro/Web Pro by Evert Bloemsma

FF Magda Clean

FF Magda Clean Offc Pro/Web Pro by Cornel Windlin, Critzla and Henning Krause

FF Market

FF Market Offc Pro/Web Pro by H. A. Simon

FF Max & FF Max Demi Serif

FF Max Offc Pro/Web Pro & FF Max Demi Serif Offc Pro/Web Pro by Morten Olsen

FF Meta Headline

FF Meta Headline Offc Pro/Web Pro by Erik SpiekermannChristian SchwartzJosh Darden 

FF Prater

FF Prater Offc Pro/Web Pro by Henning WagenbrethSteffen Sauerteig

FF Quadraat and FF Quadraat Sans Mono

FF Quadraat Display Offc Pro/Web Pro & FF Quadraat Sans Mono by Fred Smeijers 

FF Schulbuch

FF Schulbuch Offc Pro/Web Pro by Just van Rossum

FF Seria & FF Seria Sans

FF Seria Offc Pro/Web Pro & FF Seria Sans Off Pro/Web Pro by Martin Majoor

FF Strada & FF Strada Condensed

FF Strada Offc Pro/Web Pro & FF Strada Condensed Offc Pro/Web Pro by Albert Pinggera 

FF Transit

FF Transit Offc Pro/Web Pro by MetaDesign

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New release FF52: A new era for web design

Typographic diversity – A new era for web design

BERLIN, GERMANY, February 2010

A more diverse and beautiful web is about to unfold. The latest release of the FontFont® typeface library marks the beginning of a new era for typography – FSI FontShop® International is introducing the first ever stand-alone FontFonts for the web. Finally web designers can use professional typefaces for their projects without relying on system fonts or webfont services. This long-awaited step enables a more seamless and effective transition from print design to the web. More than 30 of the most successful FontFont families are available now as Web FontFonts, including FF DIN®, FF Meta®, FF Dax®, and FF Kievit®. More will follow soon.

First Web FontFonts

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New release: FF50

BERLIN, GERMANY, November 2009 – FSI FontShop International announced the latest additions to its award-winning FontFont® typeface library.

The new FontFonts

FF Mach

FF Mach The very first sketches of FF Mach were drawn in 2004 when a colleague who planned a new Polish magazine about culture and arts asked Łukasz Dziedzic for a logo – there was neither time nor money, so he did it quickly and for free. The logo was met with approval and Łukasz was asked for some sample covers and a few days later for the whole layout – again immediately and free of charge. Łukasz agreed with mixed feelings, thinking this might be a chance to use some of his fonts and even make a new one based on the logo and title graphics. The new font worked well but unfortunately, after the magazine failed three months later, it was never used again until Łukasz decided in 2008 to redraw all the glyphs in order to remove the traces of that speedy work, and in the end he designed a complete new type family with six weights and three widths.

FF Masala
FF Masala

FF Masala is as unctuous as a curry sauce with a hint of chili to add zest. Xavier Dupré’s initial idea for FF Masala was to offer a casual Sans matching FF Tartine Script. After rethinking and refining, FF Masala became a truly casual type system with three Sans weights and their Italics plus three powerful Script versions with swashes, right for logos and packaging as well as comics or children’s book covers.

FF DIN Italic

FF DIN® Condensed Italic — The FF DIN family has been completed by FF DIN Condensed Italic including Latin Extended and Cyrillic Extended characters.

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