News: Tagged as FF Parable

Best Collection FontFonts for Small Text

Think of small text, and often legalese, terms of use, credits, and tiny annoying instructions spring to mind. When working with the strict number of constraints that come with small text, it’s sometimes tricky to know where to start. So to help you weave your way through the world of small text, here are some tips and tricks and a roundup of our best Collection Tier FontFonts suitable for this slight but by no means insignificant intended use.

FF Bradlo Sans & FF Bradlo Slab

FF Bradlo

FF Elementa

FF Elementa

FF Schmalhans

FF Schmalhans

FF Plus Sans

FF Plus Sans

FF Sheriff

FF Sheriff

FF Parable

FF Parable

FF Roice

FF Roice

FF Instanter

FF Instanter

When it comes to small text, it’s the size of the letters within the available space that counts. To ensure optimal legibility simpler forms help. No parts of the text should disappear. Typefaces optimized for small sizes often have reduced stroke contrast; the thinner parts of the letters are almost as heavy as the thick bits. A high x-height can help, too – plus short ascenders and even shorter descenders. Letters themselves are often somewhat wider. If your typeface doesn’t already have generous letter spacing, add more tracking to your text!

It may be true that we read best what we read most. For years, much of the tiniest text appeared in dictionaries and newspaper classified ads; these were often set in serif faces. However, sans serifs perform well in this environment if they have large counters and open apertures – think about the traits in humanist sans types. Whatever typeface you pick, it should not be too fancy: small text leaves no room for detail.

Small text rarely appears alone – who wants to read a document where everything is tiny? Go for a selection that works well small, but also includes some contrast between its family’s weights: If you set some words in the middle of a line in bold, you won’t want this to go unnoticed to the reader. Think about how your selection combines stylistically with the larger type in the document, too.

Catch up on our previous intended use posts:

About our Collection Tier

Our Collection Tier FontFonts are a selection of cost-effective typographical treasures offered as full families. All packages are available in OpenType with Standard language support (with a few key exceptions) and are all affordably priced under €/$ 100 each.

permalink

Best FontFonts for Book Text from our Collection Tier

They say that you can’t judge a book by its cover. Yet the choice of a typeface in a book can have a fundamental impact on the reader’s experience of the book. If a book’s text is too tight it can be tricky to read, if parts of the letters are too thin they can disappear off the page. In the third installment of our Collection Tier blog series, we tackle the typographic heights of book text and offer some handy hints and tips as well as a roundup of our chosen picks from our Collection Tier suitable for book text.

FF ParableFF Parable

FF RemingaFF Reminga

FF ParangoFF Parango

FF Oneleigh

FF Oneleigh

FF TibereFF Tibere

FF Page

FF Page

In long passages of running text – either in a book or magazine – make sure to select a typeface whose letters are not too tight. Maintaining an even rhythm is one of the most important factors in a good text face. The white spaces between the letters of a word or line should be about the same size, visually, as the white space inside the letters (like the letter ‘n’). In display faces, letters can be spaced much more tightly together.

Make sure that the thin strokes are just right! When you are printing small, the thickness of the thin parts of the letters must still be thick enough on the page so that it does not break away. Book faces tend to have some degree of contrast between thick and thin strokes. Just remember that the thick strokes should not be too thick, and that the thin strokes should not be too thin. Display types can pump up the contrast a lot more than text faces should.

Check the fonts’ OpenType feature availability. In immersive reading environments like books, oldstyle figures are both elegant and helpful. Lining figures can form a dark block, disturbing the even flow of a text. Small caps can be useful for acronyms, etc. – they help maintain a text’s consistent rhythm, too. Aside from making sure that the ‘f’ doesn’t collide with letters that come after it, ligatures aren’t really necessary in book text sizes. In display applications, though, ligatures can add a great note to a design. Larger-sized text allows plenty of room for ligatures to call attention to themselves.

Did you miss out on our previous Collection Tier posts? Have a look at our tips and picks for Music and Nightlife and Sports. Next up in our series, our Collection Tier selection suitable for Corporate Identity, Branding and Logos. 

About our Collection Tier

Our Collection Tier FontFonts are a selection of cost effective typographical treasures offered as full-families. All packages are available in OpenType with Standard language support (with a few key exceptions) and are all affordably priced under €/$ 100 each.

permalink

New release: FF45

Each FontFont release is newsworthy in its own right, but there is something especially momentous about this one: four brand new families, each one very different from the others; new styles for three of our most popular typefaces; and a dozen expertly crafted OpenType releases that breathe new life into FontFont classics.

FontFont Release 45

read more