News: Tagged as FF Meta Hebrew

New release: FF55

BERLIN, GERMANY, April 2011 – FSI FontShop International announced the latest additions to its award-winning FontFont® typeface library.

The new designs

FF SpinozaMax Phillips developed FF Spinoza over a period of eleven years. With the goal of readability in mind, Phillips named the typeface after 17th century rationalist and lens-grinder Baruch Spinoza, a man whose job it was to help people see clearly. The family is meant as an elegant workhorse, a classic text family with just enough individual character to hold its own in display sizes. It was inspired by mid-century German book faces like Trump Mediaeval and Aldus, and by the types of Nicolas Kis. The forms are narrow and economical, with open counters. The line is firm and distinct. It has strong thick strokes and serifs to help it grip the page. Its intended virtues are firmness, clarity and modesty.

FF Spinoza

Download the FF Spinoza specimen (PDF, 1.9 MB).

FF More — It’s easy to find sans serif typefaces with multiple widths and weights, but large serif families are much less common. The 30-font FF More fills this void. Five weights in each of Condensed, Regular, and Wide widths answer every need of publication design, from strong headlines to readable text and space-efficient information graphics. FF More’s sturdy serifs and gentle contrast withstand the rigors of magazine and newspaper design — retaining clarity despite size, background, or substrate.

Łukasz Dziedzic built FF More to work alongside FF Good, resulting in a powerhouse superfamily, versatile in both its function and aesthetic.

FF More

Download the FF More specimen (PDF, 5.4 MB).

Updated and extended FontFonts

FF Meta HebrewErik Spiekermann’s FF Meta is the foundation of the FontFont library, released at the label’s inception and still a signature of the brand. Its ancestor – PT55 (1985) – was conceived for the West German Post Office as a economical typeface for use at small point sizes, but once FF Meta was released to the public it was used for nearly everything, quickly becoming one of the most popular typefaces of the computer era. It has been called the “Helvetica of the ’90s”  – not because the two typefaces have anything aesthetically in common – but because FF Meta fulfills so well the needs of modern communication. Oded Ezer designed a Hebrew version for Book and Bold.

FF Meta Hebrew

FontFont Release 55 marks a distinctive milestone — the entire FF library is now available in OpenType, while PostScript formats have been retired.

In addition, more FontFont families were converted to the Offc format (e.g. FF Sanuk and FF Isonorm). An important improvement is that Small Caps are now bundled for Offc fonts — if a font has a Small Caps version it is sold together with its companion, heavily discounting the Small Caps font.

On the OpenType Pro front, FF Sanuk was extended to Pro, and the lightest weights of FF Meta Pro, FF Meta Condensed Offc Pro, and FF Signa Correspondence Pro all received Cyrillic upgrades.

New Web FontFonts

New Web FontFonts

Aside from the two new families, ten more popular FontFont families were converted to webfonts: FF Balance, FF Chambers Sans, FF Isonorm, FF Magda, FF Oxide, FF Pitu, FF QType Square, FF SanukFF Signa Correspondence and FF Tartine Script. Web FontFonts are optimized for use on web pages using the @font-face rule. This means websites can now display HTML text in fonts other than the handful of “web safe” options of yesteryear. Because HTML text is far more flexible and easier to update than an image, using Web FontFonts gives the user customized, dynamic type. Furthermore, branded typography on web pages can be found and indexed by search engines. Text is also more accessible to users with disabilities. And because it can be resized, copied, and edited by website visitors, webfonts allow for stylized interfaces, forms, and applications without relying on Flash or other hacks.

Learn more about our different formats here.

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