News: Tagged as FF Mach

Best Collection FontFonts for Editorial and Publishing

Next up in our Collection FontFonts series we present our ‘Best Collection FontFonts for Editorial and Publishing’. Whether you’re looking for a fantastic font for your next bestselling book or a terrific typeface to match your message, here’s a look at our favorite Collection FontFonts for Editorial and Publishing and some hints and tips.

FF Handwriter and FF Beowolf

FF Handwriter and FF Beowolf

FF Holmen

FF Holmen

FF Extra and FF Typeface Four

FF Extra and FF Typeface Four

FF Rattlescript

FF Rattlescript

FF Wunderlich and FF Pitu and FF Stealth

FF Wunderlich and FF Pitu

FF Routes and FF Schmalhans

FF Route and FF Schmalhans

FF Mach and FF BeoSans

FF Mach and FF Beo Sans

FF Acanthus

FF Acantus

Typefaces used in editorial design typically call attention to themselves, but they should not appear so individual that they overpower the message of the text. The selections that you make will become the voice of your publication: this is your opportunity to be unique.

When it comes to editorial design and publishing, design work is usually done on a tight deadline. Your publication’s designers probably work in a larger layout team. Everyone on board needs to be able to make do with the typefaces they have at hand, so be sure to make selections that will provide them versatility, right off the bat. Larger families with many weights and widths are a good start. If you don’t want to pick a superfamily, consider serif and sans serif typefaces that can combine well together on the same page.

In this area of graphic design, designers have the freedom to pick type that is a little more elegant than in many other applications. Remember what makes a typeface appear classic – this could be a great time to look through selections with ‘low’ x-heights, especially if your page layout has room for text with long ascenders and descenders. There are many different kinds of serifs, too. Take the opportunity to pick one whose form matches your message, be it elegant, sharp or soft.

Catch up on our previous intended use posts:

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Best Collection FontFonts for Music and Nightlife

To help you navigate your way around our vast assortment of typographical treats, we made some changes last year to the way our library is structured and introduced three tiers: Premium, Collection and Free.

Over the coming months, we will feature our top Collection Tier FontFonts for a particular intended use and give you some handy tips and hints on how to use them. We’ve mentioned before that we are powered by music and although the summer may not be sizzling, the music festival season has certainly arrived; so first up in this series are our top ten typefaces suitable for use in music and nightlife.

FF Imperial

FF Imperial

FF Minimum

FF Minimum

FF Amoeba

FF Amoeba

FF Flava

FF Flava

 FF Bionic

FF Bionic

FF Karo

FF Karo

FF Softsoul

FF Soul

FF Container

FF Container

FF Mach

FF Mach

FF Massive

FF Massive

Audience: Can a typeface look like music? Maybe. The right face for a violin concerto CD probably won’t be the best choice for a DJ’s website, though. When it comes to selecting type for music and nightlife, the right ones are all about appearances; legibility and even readability take a back seat.

Think of the great psychedelic posters from the ’60s or the dance club flyers from the ’90s – neither of these typically featured text that was easy to read.

The typefaces you select for music and nightlife should be geared toward the particular audience. Contemporary music needs type that feels like it was made now. ‘Corporate’-looking fonts will probably be the wrong fit.

Usage: Choose your type based on where it will be seen. Album covers, t-shirts and posters are an opportunity to create work that is illustrative and unique, while advertisements for an act’s concert appearances or for specific clubs offer less leeway

Fans will be able to pick out their favorite band from a sea of logos, but when you present information about where they will play, when tickets will be available and how much they cost, you can help the reader by listing these bits of information clearly.

Music and nightlife allow typeface combinations that would never normally go together in a corporate setting. Try to find imaginative styles for band identities, or for the venues where they will appear. Combine these with something clear and more subdued for everyday information; this stuff is less important in a visual hierarchy than the creative side, but it should still communicate what it has to.

Ecosystem: Type is just one element of the mix for music and nightlife. How does it combine with photographs, illustrations, or even simple fields of color? Words don’t have to be written with ornate letters to be decorative – big fat block letters can do the trick, depending on what other elements you mix them together with. Especially in this category of design, it is definitely OK to use all-caps text.

Although your design doesn’t have to be 100% about the type, good fonts will help strike the right tone. When you select your typefaces, think about what other design elements you will be combining them with. If imagery is a more important part of your band’s ‘identity’, take this into consideration. Sticking to one family with several weights and widths may offer enough versatility.

 

Have a browse of all our Collection Tier typefaces suitable for music and nightlife. Let us know which ones you would add to the list!

About our Collection Tier

Our Collection Tier FontFonts are a selection of cost effective typographical treasures offered as full-families. All packages are available in OpenType with Standard language support (with a few key exceptions) and are all affordably priced under €/$ 100 each.

About the Intended Use function

The intended use function helps you easily sift through the multitude of fonts on offer. With categories ranging from Book Text to Wayfinding and Signage, from Posters and Billboards to Festive Occasions, there are over 12 different intended use categories to help you find the perfect typographical match for your project.

Next up in our series — Our top Collection Tier FontFonts suitable for Sport.

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Why Łukasz Dziedzic designed FF Mach

Our dear friend and FontFont designer Łukasz Dziedzic describes in his own words, why he designed FF Mach:

FF Mach

1st Reason: Because I was tired of the ugliness and uselessness of constructivist fonts. In most cases they have no lowercase and reading them is a nightmare. I decided to make an easy to read font with no curves. Not one curve! But fancy.

2nd Reason: Because I like to design fonts.

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December 9th, 2011 Comments

New release FF52: A new era for web design

Typographic diversity – A new era for web design

BERLIN, GERMANY, February 2010

A more diverse and beautiful web is about to unfold. The latest release of the FontFont® typeface library marks the beginning of a new era for typography – FSI FontShop® International is introducing the first ever stand-alone FontFonts for the web. Finally web designers can use professional typefaces for their projects without relying on system fonts or webfont services. This long-awaited step enables a more seamless and effective transition from print design to the web. More than 30 of the most successful FontFont families are available now as Web FontFonts, including FF DIN®, FF Meta®, FF Dax®, and FF Kievit®. More will follow soon.

First Web FontFonts

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New release: FF50

BERLIN, GERMANY, November 2009 – FSI FontShop International announced the latest additions to its award-winning FontFont® typeface library.

The new FontFonts

FF Mach

FF Mach The very first sketches of FF Mach were drawn in 2004 when a colleague who planned a new Polish magazine about culture and arts asked Łukasz Dziedzic for a logo – there was neither time nor money, so he did it quickly and for free. The logo was met with approval and Łukasz was asked for some sample covers and a few days later for the whole layout – again immediately and free of charge. Łukasz agreed with mixed feelings, thinking this might be a chance to use some of his fonts and even make a new one based on the logo and title graphics. The new font worked well but unfortunately, after the magazine failed three months later, it was never used again until Łukasz decided in 2008 to redraw all the glyphs in order to remove the traces of that speedy work, and in the end he designed a complete new type family with six weights and three widths.

FF Masala
FF Masala

FF Masala is as unctuous as a curry sauce with a hint of chili to add zest. Xavier Dupré’s initial idea for FF Masala was to offer a casual Sans matching FF Tartine Script. After rethinking and refining, FF Masala became a truly casual type system with three Sans weights and their Italics plus three powerful Script versions with swashes, right for logos and packaging as well as comics or children’s book covers.

FF DIN Italic

FF DIN® Condensed Italic — The FF DIN family has been completed by FF DIN Condensed Italic including Latin Extended and Cyrillic Extended characters.

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