News: Tagged as FF Karbid Display

Karbid Book Giveaway - The Winners

Time is up to enter our competition to win one of 15 copies of the new Karbid: Berlin - From Lettering to Type Design!

Thank you for all of your beautiful and inspiring entries, we wish we could have given each one a prize, but here are the 15 images that really caught the eye of FF Karbid’s designer, Verena Gerlach:

Andrea Curtis

Andrea Curtis – Michigan, USA

Eero Antturi

Eero Antturi – Helsinki, Finland

Etienne Pouvreau

Étienne Pouvreau – Ocqueville, France

Felix Arnold

Felix Arnold – Walkringen, Switzerland

Florian Hardwig

Florian Hardwig  Berlin, Germany

Paul O'Rely

Paul O’Rely – São Paulo, Brazil

Nicolaskrizan Skovde

Nicolas Krizan  Skövde, Sweden

Georg Andreas Suhr

Georg Andreas Suhr – Westbengal, India

Martina Flor

Martina Flor – Berlin, Germany

Ralf Zeigermann

Ralf Zeigermann  Brussels, Belgium

Scott Maurer

Scott Maurer – Madison Wisconsin, USA

Peter Presseg

Peter Presseg – Vienna, Austria

Stephan Wilke

Stephan Wilke  Berlin, Germany

Slávka Pauliková

Slávka Pauliková  Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Shtiliana Andonova

Shtiliana Andonova  Krumovo, Bulgaria

 

All of our lucky winners will be notified and can look forward to receiving this beautiful book by post.

Published by Ypsilon Éditeur in trilingual (French, English and German) format, the Karbid book is a text and pictorial archive telling the complete story behind Verena Gerlach’s typeface FF Karbid that also pays homage to the history of German lettering and the letter paintings of Berlin.

Once again thanks to all those who took part, it was fantastic to see what lettering in and around your city inspires you!

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Karbid Book Giveaway

Karbid Book Giveaway

To celebrate the recent release of the book Karbid: Berlin—From Lettering to Type Design, we have 15 copies to giveaway.

To win: send us a picture of a piece of lettering in your city that inspires you.

Email your photo to news@fontfont.com with your name, city, occupation, delivery address, and the subject title “Letters in my City”. The winners will be selected by Verena Gerlach.

Deadline extended!

Entries close 31st January 2014: 15 winners will receive a copy of the book and submissions will also be featured on our FontFont Flickr page. Winners will be announced on the fontfont.com news page.

Read more about the FF Karbid and the making of the book here.

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New Release: FF57

BERLIN, GERMANY, October 2011 – FontShop International announced the latest additions to its award-winning FontFont® typeface library.

Redesign and new styles

FF Karbid: Revised & extended

FF Karbid Slab
FF Karbid Slab in use, Book design Janet Cardiff & George Bures Miller ‘The Murder of Crows’ (Hatje Cantz, 2011)

Originally published in only three text weights and one display version in 1999, the original FF Karbid is an interpretation of vintage German storefront lettering from the early 1900s. Verena Gerlach collected and documented a lot of these alphabets in the Berlin quarters Prenzlauer Berg and Mitte. Although they have now almost completely disappeared due to the renovation works in the unified German capital, the spirit of those characteristic letters lives on in the concept of FF Karbid.

FF Karbid now offers a balanced range of five weights—from Light to Black—each with matching obliques. All versions of FF Karbid offer numerous alternate characters that alter their appearance and mood. These are based on the rather eccentric forms of Art Deco lettering—low- and high-waisted capitals; round versions of A, C, E; single-storey a & g, and many more. The fonts include numerous figure sets, arrows and bullets, and offer Latin Extended language support.

Families

The new FF Karbid is a harmonized redesign of the original typeface. Rounder and less narrow letters lend the shapes more space and balance. Although the contrast was reduced to obtain a harmonious monolinear typeface (without losing its liveliness) it was increased in the bolder weights to improve legibility and achieve a certain elegance. FF Karbid Display is the most obvious spin-off of the original FF Karbid. More than merely having been assimilated, the letter forms were revised according to the new concept. The FF Karbid family has been augmented with two entirely new sub-families. The first one, the Text version, is intended for body copy in small sizes. The eccentric, serif-like swashes in select letters have been abandoned, while the friendly, lively forms of l, y, z and Z show the close relationship to the FF Karbid family. The other new sub-family is a Slab version. It has a sober, journalistic character, inspired by the typography in magazines of the 1920s (see Memphis, etc.). The strong serifs lend the typeface footing and an air of reliability. To improve legibility and balance the contrast was increased in comparison to the sans serif version.

Updated and extended FontFonts

FontFont continues its steady conversion of its library in Web & Office versions. This time FF Nexus and FF Signa Serif were released in both font formats.

Language extensions continue as well: FF Unit Pro speaks Cyrillic and Greek now.

FF Nexus Mix, FF Nexus Serif, FF Nexus Sans, FF Nexus Typewriter

FF Nexus

Ten years after his iconic FF Scala, Martin Majoor expanded his idea of “two typefaces; one form principle” into “three typefaces; one form principle.” The result: a new family of typefaces. FF Nexus borrows some of its structure from FF Scala, but adds the slab-like FF Nexus Mix and monospaced FF Nexus Typewriter to the set. The four coordinated families form a powerhouse type system, combining elegance with versatility. Web and office versions are now available.

FF Signa Serif

FF Signa is a typically Danish typeface by Ole Søndergaard, rooted in architectural lettering rather than book typography. Concise letterforms and a minimum of detail produce clear and harmonious word images. Designed for the Danish Design Center, it is used there for printed material and exhibitions as well as the internal signage system. There are Condensed, Extended and Correspondence versions, and in 2005 FF Signa Serif joined the family. Now the web and office versions are also available for FF Signa Serif.

FF Unit

FF Unit Showing

FF Unit was designed by Erik Spiekermann and produced by Christian Schwartz. FF Unit is the grown-up, no-nonsense sister of Spiekermann’s famous FF Meta. With FF Unit, puppy fat is off, some curves are gone and the shapes are tighter. While FF Meta has always been a little out-of-line and not exactly an over-engineered typeface, FF Unit is less outspoken and more disciplined. It is—like FF Meta—very suitable for use quite small and large, but FF Unit lacks some of the diagonal strokes and curves that give FF Meta its slight informality. However, FF Unit is not cold or uptight, just cool: no redundant ornamentation, just a lot of character. The tighter shapes make it suitable for big headlines set tight. Smaller sizes benefit from the increased contrast between vertical and horizontal strokes and open spacing. Thin and Light perform well set large, displaying the characters to their advantage. There is a great difference in weight between the Thin and Ultra, providing a good range of weights for contrasting combinations. Alternative characters (a, g, i, j, l, U, M) make for interesting headlines. The Small Caps are a bit larger than normal, making them suitable for abbreviations and acronyms. The many weights include old style, regular, and tabular figures. FF Unit Pro is now available with Cyrillic and Greek character sets. The entire FF Unit super family consists of FF Unit, FF Unit Slab, and FF Unit Rounded.

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