News: Tagged as FF Dax

Our top 10 most popular webfonts in-use

You may have heard that our Web FontFonts are now supported by 98% of all desktop browsers. With a tantalising typographical treasure trove of 2240 Web FontFonts, it’s sometimes tricky to decide which web font is the best fit for your online brand presence. To provide a little inspiration and help you choose, we’ve brought together a selection of in-use cases of our top ten most popular web fonts that have caught our eye recently. 

FF Meta & FF Meta Serif

Parse by HowThe marvellous FF Meta and FF Meta Serif, Erik Spiekermann’s No-Brainer, feature on this great site Parse by How. Parse is a real smörgåsbord of design content; they scour the web to bring together what they call design ‘tapas for the brain’. 

FF DIN

FF DIN in-use

One of our bestsellers and a real classic typeface, FF DIN, features on the Budget 4 Change website. The thin horizontal strokes and fluent curves of FF DIN provide a sober and solid tone to the site which is dedicated to mapping, tracking and analyzing donor government budgets against official development assistance.

FF Unit & FF Unit Slab

Typolution

Evolution, Revolution, Solution. That is the simple philosophy behind Typolution, the ‘purely’ typographical website that covers the latest developments, innovations and advancements in the industry (all in German). The site uses our very own FF Unit for the body text and FF Unit Slab for the headers, offering a cool yet disciplined tone.

FF Dax

Juventus Member

FF Dax adorns the official team fan page of the football club Juventus, the site is the go-to resource for Juventus fans to join the community of supporters and buy a subscription.

FF Scala & FF Scala Sans

VRB

The website for the VRB (Vorratsgesellschaft) organization based in Germany is set in one of the bestselling and most serious text faces, the formidable FF Scala and FF Scala Sans. The VRB offers ‘off the’ Shelf Companies and legal advice. 

FF Tisa & FF Tisa Sans

Espen Dreyer

Espen Dreyer is a Norwegian freelance photographer and his website packed full of lovely snapshots. Set in one of our most prolific Web FontFonts, FF Tisa and the recently released FF Tisa Sans

FF Kievit

Blossom

The new start-up Blossom, offers a brand new product management tool and features Mike Abbink’s FF Kievit which offers a clean and open touch to their site.

FF Clan

Red Bull Academy Radio

The website of the Red Bull Music Academy Radio really packs a punch with the use of the strong and powerful FF favorite, FF Clan which was designed by Łukasz Dziedzic.

FF Fago

Regmodharz

The mighty fine FF Fago, one of our super families designed by Ole Schäfer, provides a conscious corporate air to the online presence of the green energy project, RegModHarz.

FF Dagny

Two Arms Inc.

Two Arms Inc are a team of two, who combine illustration and design in a delightful manner. Based in Brooklyn they are famed for their passion for screenprinting. Their website employs FF Dagny, by Örjan Nordling and Göran Söderström. Great minds think alike, as we use it on our site too!

We’ve recently received some lovely examples of FontFonts in-use. Keep ’em coming! If you’ve used a FF in a recent project and you’d like to be featured on our site, please email lucy@fontfont.de.

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Hans Reichel 1949–2011

Hans Reichel
Photo: Marc Eckardt

The Wuppertal musician, instrument builder, graphic designer and type designer Hans Reichel suddenly and unexpectedly passed away in his studio last Tuesday. Designers and typographers know him as the creator of the popular Barmeno and the world-renowned FF Dax family. Other type designs by Reichel are FF Daxline, FF Sari, FF Schmalhans, and FF Routes.

Hans Reichel appeared on the type scene with his first design Barmeno, an idiosyncratic sans serif released in 1983 by Berthold. He would revisit this concept of a rounded spurless design in 1999 with FF Sari. Expanding on his original ideas he devised a more versatile and complete interpretation, with a wider range of weights and a comprehensive character set.

Although Barmeno and FF Sari enjoyed seizable success, Hans Reichel’s real breakthrough as a type designer came with the typographic powerhouse FF Dax. Slightly more angular and systematic than its predecessor, this immensely popular type family has become arguably one of the most used advertising faces worldwide since its release fifteen years ago. The FF Dax family was gradually augmented with compact, condensed and wide versions, and italics for all variants.

Also FF Dax was subsequently revisited. Seeing Akira Kobayashi’s lecture about Adrian Frutiger’s Avenir Next at TYPO Berlin 2004 inspired Hans Reichel to start working on FF Daxline. The improved proportions and decreased stress make it better suited for text use. Personally Reichel thought FF Daxline to be the better typeface – it is clearer, airier and more versatile. Reichel toyed with the idea of creating a condensed version, but wasn’t sure if he’d still be able to swing it at his “retirement age”. Sadly, now we will never know.

Through the music he created, through the instruments he built, and through the typefaces he designed Hans Reichel shone as a fiercely original voice. With the disappearance of this multitalented maverick artist the type and music world is left a little poorer, a little less wondrous.

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New release: FF54

BERLIN, GERMANY, December 2010 – FSI FontShop International announced the latest additions to its award-winning FontFont® typeface library.

The new FontFonts

FF Basic Gothic

FF Basic Gothic — Due to its popularity online, Verdana has effectively become the basic sans serif. Yet in print it tends to looks too heavy and a little unwieldy. As a response to this FontFont releases FF Basic Gothic. Influenced by the early sans serif typefaces of the 19th century and developed for today’s highest standards, it is a sans serif optimized for maximum legibility. With its functional, basic look, it is willful but pleasant at the same time. Inspired by the unique letter forms of Gill Sans and Antique Olive, designers Hannes von Döhren and Livius Dietzel searched for exceptional yet legible proportions. At the same time, the letters are stripped down to their basic forms, with precise curves and straight lines, making FF Basic Gothic extremely versatile for a multitude of applications.

Their extended weight range makes it interesting for corporate designers; TYPO Berlin 2011 already trusts on FF Basic Gothic (as well as on FF Scala). The type family performs especially well in small sizes, both in print and on the screen – thanks to the hinting experts of the FontFont Type Department.

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New release FF52: A new era for web design

Typographic diversity – A new era for web design

BERLIN, GERMANY, February 2010

A more diverse and beautiful web is about to unfold. The latest release of the FontFont® typeface library marks the beginning of a new era for typography – FSI FontShop® International is introducing the first ever stand-alone FontFonts for the web. Finally web designers can use professional typefaces for their projects without relying on system fonts or webfont services. This long-awaited step enables a more seamless and effective transition from print design to the web. More than 30 of the most successful FontFont families are available now as Web FontFonts, including FF DIN®, FF Meta®, FF Dax®, and FF Kievit®. More will follow soon.

First Web FontFonts

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New release: FF50

BERLIN, GERMANY, November 2009 – FSI FontShop International announced the latest additions to its award-winning FontFont® typeface library.

The new FontFonts

FF Mach

FF Mach The very first sketches of FF Mach were drawn in 2004 when a colleague who planned a new Polish magazine about culture and arts asked Łukasz Dziedzic for a logo – there was neither time nor money, so he did it quickly and for free. The logo was met with approval and Łukasz was asked for some sample covers and a few days later for the whole layout – again immediately and free of charge. Łukasz agreed with mixed feelings, thinking this might be a chance to use some of his fonts and even make a new one based on the logo and title graphics. The new font worked well but unfortunately, after the magazine failed three months later, it was never used again until Łukasz decided in 2008 to redraw all the glyphs in order to remove the traces of that speedy work, and in the end he designed a complete new type family with six weights and three widths.

FF Masala
FF Masala

FF Masala is as unctuous as a curry sauce with a hint of chili to add zest. Xavier Dupré’s initial idea for FF Masala was to offer a casual Sans matching FF Tartine Script. After rethinking and refining, FF Masala became a truly casual type system with three Sans weights and their Italics plus three powerful Script versions with swashes, right for logos and packaging as well as comics or children’s book covers.

FF DIN Italic

FF DIN® Condensed Italic — The FF DIN family has been completed by FF DIN Condensed Italic including Latin Extended and Cyrillic Extended characters.

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New release: FF47

New design

FF Mister K Pro by Julia Sysmäläinen – The manuscripts of author Franz Kafka had such a profound impact on Finnish graphic and type designer Julia Sysmäläinen that she decided to convert his handwriting with its unusually strong calligraphic characteristics into a digital script. Read more about FF Mister K’s features (like scribbles, underlines, and multiple alternates) and download a PDF at the FontFeed.

FontFont Release 47

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New release: FF46

These are the latest additions (release 46) to the FontFont library:

FontFont Release 46

New FontFonts and extensions

FF Chambers Sans OT by Verena Gerlach – Verena Gerlach’s experiment with oppositional styles resulted in this combination of static grotesque forms and the dynamic forms of a traditional antique typeface. The weights and italics are finely balanced so that it is especially suitable for setting books, but its frugal originality is also appropriate for use in large sizes like in poster design. The type family contains a range of alternate characters, small caps, ligatures, and (in the Regular weight) swashed initials, making it a versatile typographic tool.

FF Enzo OT 1 by Tobias Kvant – Inspired by a variety of styles, both past and present, FF Enzo is a lively multi-weight sans serif. Its extremely large x-height, and short ascenders and descenders make it a powerful headline face, ideal for magazines, posters and such, but it will work fine for body text as well. The family includes italics, tabular figures and four sets of small figures. FF Enzo is the first major typeface from Sweden’s Tobias Kvant, yet it demonstrates a great deal of understanding and skill. We expect to see more in the future from this fine young talent.

FF Max Pro 3 by Morten Olsen – It’s always been popular, but Morten Olsen’s FF Max is due for a major resurgence in today’s design landscape of square forms and rounded edges. The typeface is as fresh now as it was when it was released five years ago, and now it’s even more flexible thanks to two new weights at either end of the family: Extra Light and Fat.

FF Netto OT by Daniel Utz – With FF Netto, Daniel Utz has stripped letters of any historical detail, leaving them with the barest, clearest forms possible. This makes FF Netto ideal for wayfinding, where quick recognition is essential. A series of simple and useful icons and arrows add to its utility for information design, and intelligent borders let you group the pictograms using just a few keystrokes.

[ Link missing ] by Fred Smeijers – A new FF Quadraat Sans weight: Bold Italic

FF Trixie HD Pro Light by Erik van Blokland – Since its release in 1991, from “The X-Files” to “Atonement”, FF Trixie has served as the defacto typeface of mystery and intrigue. For years, it was the most convincing typewriter font available, but FontFont veteran Erik van Blokland was not satisfied. Early printing and operating systems could only handle so many points per font, so FF Trixie’s outlines weren’t as realistic as he wanted. Enter OpenType. Now that technology has caught up with his vision, Van Blokland has thrown everything he can at it. The new FF Trixie offers Rough variations that have more detail for use at larger sizes, yet keep the same overall shape as the originals. But the real advancement is found in FF Trixie HD, which contains seven alternates for each character, each with its own weight and texture. Just like typewritten forms, the letters dance on the baseline and reveal the effect of ink on the ribbon. Van Blokland didn’t stop there. Playing with OpenType’s ability to automatically substitute glyphs, he added a variety of clever effects such as more erratic baseline shifting, faux Greek and Cyrillic, and censor simulation. FF Trixie HD sets a new standard for detail and artificial intelligence. We can safely say no digital font comes closer to emulating a mechanical typewriter. The OT package contains all the features above. Go Pro for CE, Greek, and Cyrillic support.

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New release: FF45

Each FontFont release is newsworthy in its own right, but there is something especially momentous about this one: four brand new families, each one very different from the others; new styles for three of our most popular typefaces; and a dozen expertly crafted OpenType releases that breathe new life into FontFont classics.

FontFont Release 45

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Critic’s Award in The Big Crit 1998: FF Info and FF Dax

When Critique Magazine called for entries for their annual design contest, FSI rose to the occasion by sending in FF Info and FF Dax as candidates for the typographic category of the competition. The judges for the typographic category included none less than Matthew Carter and Ellen Lupton.

Erik Spiekermann’s FF Info won the award for its ‘personal’ nature, clarity, legibility and simplicity of form – to name only a few of the listed qualities. The judges’ review ended with the statement, “This is a significant design. The world will benefit from this typeface, and designers will put it to good use.”

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