News: Tagged as FF Bradlo Sans

Best Collection FontFonts for Small Text

Think of small text, and often legalese, terms of use, credits, and tiny annoying instructions spring to mind. When working with the strict number of constraints that come with small text, it’s sometimes tricky to know where to start. So to help you weave your way through the world of small text, here are some tips and tricks and a roundup of our best Collection Tier FontFonts suitable for this slight but by no means insignificant intended use.

FF Bradlo Sans & FF Bradlo Slab

FF Bradlo

FF Elementa

FF Elementa

FF Schmalhans

FF Schmalhans

FF Plus Sans

FF Plus Sans

FF Sheriff

FF Sheriff

FF Parable

FF Parable

FF Roice

FF Roice

FF Instanter

FF Instanter

When it comes to small text, it’s the size of the letters within the available space that counts. To ensure optimal legibility simpler forms help. No parts of the text should disappear. Typefaces optimized for small sizes often have reduced stroke contrast; the thinner parts of the letters are almost as heavy as the thick bits. A high x-height can help, too – plus short ascenders and even shorter descenders. Letters themselves are often somewhat wider. If your typeface doesn’t already have generous letter spacing, add more tracking to your text!

It may be true that we read best what we read most. For years, much of the tiniest text appeared in dictionaries and newspaper classified ads; these were often set in serif faces. However, sans serifs perform well in this environment if they have large counters and open apertures – think about the traits in humanist sans types. Whatever typeface you pick, it should not be too fancy: small text leaves no room for detail.

Small text rarely appears alone – who wants to read a document where everything is tiny? Go for a selection that works well small, but also includes some contrast between its family’s weights: If you set some words in the middle of a line in bold, you won’t want this to go unnoticed to the reader. Think about how your selection combines stylistically with the larger type in the document, too.

Catch up on our previous intended use posts:

About our Collection Tier

Our Collection Tier FontFonts are a selection of cost-effective typographical treasures offered as full families. All packages are available in OpenType with Standard language support (with a few key exceptions) and are all affordably priced under €/$ 100 each.

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New release: FF54

BERLIN, GERMANY, December 2010 – FSI FontShop International announced the latest additions to its award-winning FontFont® typeface library.

The new FontFonts

FF Basic Gothic

FF Basic Gothic — Due to its popularity online, Verdana has effectively become the basic sans serif. Yet in print it tends to looks too heavy and a little unwieldy. As a response to this FontFont releases FF Basic Gothic. Influenced by the early sans serif typefaces of the 19th century and developed for today’s highest standards, it is a sans serif optimized for maximum legibility. With its functional, basic look, it is willful but pleasant at the same time. Inspired by the unique letter forms of Gill Sans and Antique Olive, designers Hannes von Döhren and Livius Dietzel searched for exceptional yet legible proportions. At the same time, the letters are stripped down to their basic forms, with precise curves and straight lines, making FF Basic Gothic extremely versatile for a multitude of applications.

Their extended weight range makes it interesting for corporate designers; TYPO Berlin 2011 already trusts on FF Basic Gothic (as well as on FF Scala). The type family performs especially well in small sizes, both in print and on the screen – thanks to the hinting experts of the FontFont Type Department.

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