News: Tagged as Erik van Blokland

FontFont sponsors ATypI Amsterdam 2013

ATypI 2013

We are very excited to be sponsoring the 57th annual Association Typographique Internationale conference. ATypI 2013 is taking place in the heart of Amsterdam city on the Dam square October 9–13.

The annual renewal of the international typographic community brings together typographers, type designers, historians, psychologists, programmers and graphic artists of the like.

“Point Counter Point” is the theme for the year, with the speaker bill including Irma BoomErik van Blokland, Albert-Jan Pool and Paul van der LaanKeep an eye out for a few more familiar FontFont faces during the conference.

ATypI Amsterdam opened yesterday and will continue through to Sunday. You can see the full programme lineup here.

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FontFont to sponsor TypeTalks 3

TypeTalks 3

We are very happy to announce that we will be sponsoring TypeTalks 3. The date is set for 6-7 September 2013 with the symposium stage heading back to its hometown, Brno.

The two-day symposium will be preceded by a three-day information design workshop led by Finnish designer Jasso Lamberg, as well as an evening of ‘extrashort’ type presentations aka TypeShorts™. Speakers for this year include Erik van BloklandLaura Meseguer and Radoslav Večerka.

TypeTalks was created as a collaborative activity, designed to raise awareness and draw attention to the importance and power of typeface design and typography amongst graphic design professionals and students. Three years on, it is now more than a conference just for typographers and type fanatics. TypeTalks aims to bring together creatives from across the entire design spectrum including graphic and web design, historians and even programmers. 

Normal bird registration is open until August 9, but places are limited so book now!

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FontFont to sponsor ISType 2013

ISType 2013

We are delighted to announce that we will be sponsoring the third ISType Conference that takes place in İstanbul from 13 to 16 June 2013.

Over the course of four days, there will be a series of nine lectures and five workshops, all focused on the theme Stroke, which was inspired by Gerrit Noordzij’s book The Stroke. The speakers line-up includes the likes of Akira Kobayashi, Robert Bringhurst, Yves Peters, Erik van Blokland and Luc(as) de Groot.

You can still register for their seminars and workshops online, but hurry as places are filling up fast.

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First ever TypeReview to take place at TYPO Berlin

Typeboard

For the first time in its history, members of the FontFont TypeBoard will be let loose on stage at TYPO Berlin to critique, commend and appraise typefaces in public. In the inaugural FontFont TypeReview, you have the chance to get your work judged by the likes of Erik Spiekermann, Erik van Blokland, Stephen Coles, Andreas Frohloff, Jürgen Siebert and Ivo Gabrowitsch.

In a fun and fast-paced hour, members of the official FontFont TypeBoard will assess and review entries. It’s a golden opportunity to gain invaluable advice, tips and feedback as to how to develop your typeface further and to hear from some typographic heroes.

So, if you are attending TYPO Berlin or are in Berlin on Friday 17 May and would like your typeface to be judged in front of a live audience, make sure you attend FontFont’s first TypeReview.

How it works

On Friday 17 May at 13.00 in the Nest at the Haus der Kulturen der Welt (House of World Cultures), Erik Spiekermann, Erik van Blokland, Stephen Coles, Andreas Frohloff, Jürgen Siebert and Ivo Gabrowitsch will take to the stage to consider, review and criticize your entry in front of an audience.

How do I enter?

If you would like for your typeface to be publically judged at TYPO Berlin, please come along to the Info Counter on Thursday 16 May with a sample/specimen of your typeface to hand it in. The FontFont TypeReview will then take place the following day, Friday 17 May at 13.00 in the Nest. Due to time constraints, although we’d love to see a full family (if you have one) you can also just enter one weight and style. 

FAQs

I’d really like to enter my typeface to FontFont TypeReview but I don’t have a ticket to TYPO, does this matter?

No, you don’t need a TYPO ticket. This session is open to everyone; just make sure you inform the door staff that you are attending FontFont’s TypeReview. 

I don’t want to enter a typeface but I’d still like to watch, is that possible?

Yes, you can still watch. As places are limited, please make sure you arrive on time.

This sounds like a great idea but I’d much prefer to submit my typeface to the official TypeBoard, how do I do so?

The official TypeBoard takes place on 15 May. All details as to how to submit your typeface can be found on our Become a FontFont Designer page.

Can I submit my typeface to the official TypeBoard AND TypeReview?

Yes, of course you can, please just inform us clearly that you would also like your submission to be considered at the TypeReview as well as TypeBoard when you send it. Please note, you will need to be able to attend on the day if you wish to enter TypeReview. All details as to how to submit your typeface to the official TypeBoard can be found on our Become a FontFont Designer page

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IE10 unlocks CSS OpenType features for Webfonts

With Mozilla’s Firefox and Microsoft’s upcoming Internet Explorer 10, a significant step has been taken toward widespread OpenType feature support, which allows for things like discretionary ligatures in text and contextual alternates in display. Now with standards solidifying, a level of typographic sophistication previously unachievable anywhere will soon be realized. Ushering in the new browser, we share this demo page with live examples of OpenType features at work. (Note that unless viewed in IE10 or a recent version of Firefox or some other new-ish Mozilla browser, the demos won’t make much sense.)

We move ahead now to take a closer look into each of the examples, and discuss what’s required before we can get started taking full advantage of this new ability. Contextual Swashes: FF Nexus Serif

Contextual Swashes | FF Nexus Serif Italic is the most comprehensive font of the FF Nexus Superfamily, containing beautiful sets of swash letters for the beginnings and ends of words. Thanks to the Contextual Swashes feature, the swash variants of the letters appear automatically in the appropriate positions (as opposed to the “regular” Swashes feature, in which you would have to decide yourself which letters should be swashed).

 Stylistic Sets: FF Unit

Stylistic Sets | FF Unit holds the library’s record for Stylistic Sets: It has a whopping 14 sets to tailor the look of selected letters to your needs. (39 OT Features in total!)

Contextual Alternates: FF Mister K

Contextual Alternates | FF Mister K isn’t available as a Web FontFont yet, and if you switch off the Contextual Alternates feature on the demo site you’ll see why: It just makes no sense to use it without the connections and letter variants that give FF Mister K its special look.

Small Caps: FF Ernestine

Small Caps | FF Ernestine is one of the few FontFonts containing two sets of small caps: Small and Petite Caps (the only other Petite Cap FontFont being FF Atma Serif). While Small Caps are available as separate Web FontFonts now, Petite Caps only become accessible through browser OpenType feature support.

Discretionary Ligatures: FF Milo Serif

Discretionary Ligatures | FF Milo Serif is one of the FontFonts that go wild with extravagant ligatures.

Oldtyle Figures: FF DIN Round

Ligatures: FF Tartine Script

Oldstyle Figures and Ligatures | FF DIN Round and FF Tartine Script can actually look like this on your website right now! Unlike the other features shown above, Oldstyle Figures and Ligatures are included (if available in the design) in all WOFF Web FontFonts today. There’s one more feature we didn’t even mention on the demo page: The Kerning feature is activated for the whole demo page. It is most noticeable in combinations like “We” and “y.”, which just look more even with kerning. This feature is included in the current WOFF Web FontFonts and is applied automatically by some browsers.

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FontShop’s FontCasts featuring seven FontFont designers

FontFont represents some of the most talented and interesting type designers in the world. And for most of the year, that’s where they are: scattered all over the globe. In celebration of FontShop’s 20th Anniversary, FSI’s Ivo Gabrowitsch took the opportunity of a rare gathering this spring to talk with seven FontFont designers and get their take on their personal history in type design and what’s coming next. These conversations, peppered with insight about the creative process, are a rare look at the faces behind the typefaces.

The first of three FontCasts – published as part of FontShop’s FontCast series – from the day features Michael Abbink from New York City (FF Kievit, FF Milo) and Erik van Blokland from The Hague (FF Trixie, FF Erikrighthand, FF Beowolf).

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New release: FF46

These are the latest additions (release 46) to the FontFont library:

FontFont Release 46

New FontFonts and extensions

FF Chambers Sans OT by Verena Gerlach – Verena Gerlach’s experiment with oppositional styles resulted in this combination of static grotesque forms and the dynamic forms of a traditional antique typeface. The weights and italics are finely balanced so that it is especially suitable for setting books, but its frugal originality is also appropriate for use in large sizes like in poster design. The type family contains a range of alternate characters, small caps, ligatures, and (in the Regular weight) swashed initials, making it a versatile typographic tool.

FF Enzo OT 1 by Tobias Kvant – Inspired by a variety of styles, both past and present, FF Enzo is a lively multi-weight sans serif. Its extremely large x-height, and short ascenders and descenders make it a powerful headline face, ideal for magazines, posters and such, but it will work fine for body text as well. The family includes italics, tabular figures and four sets of small figures. FF Enzo is the first major typeface from Sweden’s Tobias Kvant, yet it demonstrates a great deal of understanding and skill. We expect to see more in the future from this fine young talent.

FF Max Pro 3 by Morten Olsen – It’s always been popular, but Morten Olsen’s FF Max is due for a major resurgence in today’s design landscape of square forms and rounded edges. The typeface is as fresh now as it was when it was released five years ago, and now it’s even more flexible thanks to two new weights at either end of the family: Extra Light and Fat.

FF Netto OT by Daniel Utz – With FF Netto, Daniel Utz has stripped letters of any historical detail, leaving them with the barest, clearest forms possible. This makes FF Netto ideal for wayfinding, where quick recognition is essential. A series of simple and useful icons and arrows add to its utility for information design, and intelligent borders let you group the pictograms using just a few keystrokes.

[ Link missing ] by Fred Smeijers – A new FF Quadraat Sans weight: Bold Italic

FF Trixie HD Pro Light by Erik van Blokland – Since its release in 1991, from “The X-Files” to “Atonement”, FF Trixie has served as the defacto typeface of mystery and intrigue. For years, it was the most convincing typewriter font available, but FontFont veteran Erik van Blokland was not satisfied. Early printing and operating systems could only handle so many points per font, so FF Trixie’s outlines weren’t as realistic as he wanted. Enter OpenType. Now that technology has caught up with his vision, Van Blokland has thrown everything he can at it. The new FF Trixie offers Rough variations that have more detail for use at larger sizes, yet keep the same overall shape as the originals. But the real advancement is found in FF Trixie HD, which contains seven alternates for each character, each with its own weight and texture. Just like typewritten forms, the letters dance on the baseline and reveal the effect of ink on the ribbon. Van Blokland didn’t stop there. Playing with OpenType’s ability to automatically substitute glyphs, he added a variety of clever effects such as more erratic baseline shifting, faux Greek and Cyrillic, and censor simulation. FF Trixie HD sets a new standard for detail and artificial intelligence. We can safely say no digital font comes closer to emulating a mechanical typewriter. The OT package contains all the features above. Go Pro for CE, Greek, and Cyrillic support.

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New release: FF44

These are the latest additions (release 44) to the FontFont library:

The latest batch of FontFonts includes three new designs: FF Polymorph™, an exploration of global forms in the foundry’s experimental tradition; FF Unit™ Rounded, in which our founder reveals the softer side of his “strict sans”; and FF Utility™, a hard-working sans serif for text and information design. Also new is an OpenType® version of FF Celeste® Sans and numerous character set extensions to FontFont favorites for multilingual typography. Scroll on!

FontFont Release 44

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