News: Miscellaneous

FF Mark gets folded for a fictional Hungarian Guggenheim

We love it when students do something out of the ordinary with our fonts, just as Krisztián Lakosi and Richárd Lakosi have done with FF Mark.

This great reinterpretation of FF Mark features in a project that looks at the construction of a fictional Hungarian Guggenheim in Budapest whilst asking the question: How would it take shape in today’s Hungary?

During the three stages of the project, FF Mark is transformed into a folding alphabet, giving a whole new look to one of the most popular typefaces in the FontFont library.

Take a look at the whole project here.

FF Mark GuggenheimFF Mark Guggenheim

FF Mark Guggenheim

FF Mark Guggenheim

FF Mark Guggenheim

FF Mark Guggenheim

FF Mark Guggenheim

FF Mark Guggenheim

FF Mark Guggenheim

FF Mark Guggenheim

FF Mark Guggenheim

About FF Mark

FF Mark is a self-initiated collaboration between Hannes von Döhren, FontFont’s very own Christoph Koeberlin, and the entire FontFont Type Department. With the creative support/input of no less than Erik Spiekermann, they designed this distinctive typeface. FF Mark is strong, simple and bold in form and at a glance may appear to be typical of its predecessors from the time. On closer inspection, letter shapes are wider, letter proportions are better balanced and the x-height is uncharacteristically “normal” or higher, which increases its versatility tremendously.

FFMark.com is the microsite alternative to a normal font sample for FF Mark, providing a greater insight into the capabilities and background of the typeface.


 

 

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Gallery Print’s FontFont Calendar for 2015

We were over the moon to be approached by Gallery Print, the Berlin based printer specialising in cooperations with designers and artists, to design their 2015 calendar. 

Not just an ordinary calendar the custom design also doubles up as FontFont® typeface specimen, offering daily font inspiration with 365 selected FontFonts hidden behind the scratch-off panels of each day!

Designed as a set of posters, each month can be positioned side by side making it perfect for long term planning as well as offering fantastic type inspiration after use as a calendar. To find out more behind the theory and design behind this brilliantly unusual calendar head over to our Behance page.

So fancy getting your hands on a free copy? Then be sure to come down to Gallery Print's ‘End of Summer' party on Friday 29th August at 7pm for food, drinks and dancing whilst a cool selection of DJs spin vinyl on top of the printers! 

To get involved all you have to do is sign up to the guest list by August 25th on gallery-print.de/party

 

FontFont Calendar

Gallery Print Invite

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FF Good In-Use: Muzeum Warszawy

 

FF Good Muzeum Warszawy

We came across this fantastic FF Good “In-Use” case by the Warsaw Museum and its recent branding overhaul. The stylish and tasteful rebrand saw a full update of all marketing material, stationary and advertisements.

FontFont’s largest (with an awesome 196 styles) and one of the most popular typefaces, FF Good was designed by the Warsaw-based designer Łukasz Dziedzic in the city itself. 

As a sans serif family in the American Gothic tradition FF Good has something of an old heritage whilst maintaining a new and modern feel. This helps the typeface to effectively convey the sense of the history held by the museum, whilst keeping its image firmly in the 21st century.

FF Good Muzeum WarszawyFF Good Muzeum WarszawyFF Good Muzeum WarszawyFF Good Muzeum WarszawyFF Good Muzeum WarszawyFF Good Muzeum WarszawyFF Good Muzeum WarszawyFF Good Muzeum WarszawyFF Good Muzeum WarszawyFF Good Muzeum Warszawy

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New FontFont Github Account and launch of RoboChrome

We love any opportunity to be able to share our top tips and tools with you, because we know our own lives would be much harder if it wasn’t for the variety of Open Source tools we use in our font production workflow.

Which is why we’ve set up our own Github account where we will share tools from time to time to make your life easier.

Robochrome

The first thing we have to share with you is RoboChrome, an extension for the RoboFont editor, which enables font developers to add colour information to their UFO files and export it to the new colour font formats. A fantastic tool, we put it to good use when building our free FF Copa flag font that was released for the World Cup back in June.

Published under an Open Source licence, you can get your own copy of RoboChrome via our GitHub account: https://github.com/fontfont/RoboChrome


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Über FontFont FF Kava

For the latest in our Über FontFont series we celebrate the rather delightful FF Kava! This soft sans serif family is a revised version of Yanone Kaffeesatz, a typeface which became one of the most successful free fonts since Yanone released it about ten years ago.

Originally reminiscent of the old coffee house grotesk typefaces from the 1920s when shown in its heavier weights, the current FF Kava has become a more rounded version of the old Yanone Kaffeesatz. This contemporary family has a black weight, small caps and italics all designed to enhance its versatility thus resulting in an attractive, flexible and modern typeface perfect for our Über FontFont collection.

FF Kava

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FF Mark In-Use: Walter Gropius' “The Scope of Total Architecture”

FF Mark — “Ze Germanetric sans” has most recently been used in this beautiful reprint, by Przemek Dębowski and printed by Polish publishing house Karakter, of a collection of essays by the founder of the Bauhaus, Walter Gropius. Gropius’ “The Scope of Total Architecture” was originally written at a the time of an industrial boom during the early 20th Century, a time that bears a lot of influence on FF Mark — an up-to-date typeface rooted in 1920s German geometry. As a family that maintains the integrity of tradition but in a contemporary context, FF Mark is the ideal type partner to this collection of essays that are is still considered to be applicable to modern architecture today.

For these images and more head to the FontFont Behance page.

FF Mark Walter GropiusFF Mark Walter GropiusFF Mark Walter GropiusFF Mark Walter GropiusFF Mark Walter GropiusFF Mark Walter GropiusFF Mark Walter Gropius

About FF Mark

FF Mark is a self-initiated collaboration between Hannes von Döhren, FontFont’s very own Christoph Koeberlin, and the entire FontFont Type Department. With the creative support/input of no less than Erik Spiekermann, they designed this distinctive typeface. FF Mark is strong, simple and bold in form and at a glance may appear to be typical of its predecessors from the time. On closer inspection, letter shapes are wider, letter proportions are better balanced and the x-height is uncharacteristically “normal” or higher, which increases its versatility tremendously.

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FF Franziska In-Use: Rhizom Magazine

Rhizom is a student magazine project from the Department of Design at FH Münster and is a perfect example of Jakob Runge’s FF Franziska in action. Throughout the project several of the widths available within the family are put into use, contributing towards the clear design layout and flow of the magazine.

FF Franziska rhizomFF Franziska rhizomFF Franziska rhizomFF Franziska rhizomFF Franziska rhizomFF Franziska rhizomFF Franziska rhizomFF Franziska rhizomFF Franziska rhizomFF Franziska rhizomFF Franziska rhizomFF Franziska rhizom

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FF Franziska In-Use: Early Specimen

FF Franziska designer Jakob Runge put together an impressive type specimen booklet and poster as shown in the pictures below. The specimen goes a long way to show the versitility and usability of Franziska before its development work by the FontFont Type Department.

FF Franziska SpecimenFF Franziska SpecimenFF Franziska SpecimenFF Franziska SpecimenFF Franziska SpecimenFF Franziska SpecimenFF Franziska SpecimenFF Franziska SpecimenFF Franziska SpecimenFF Franziska SpecimenFF Franziska SpecimenFF Franziska SpecimenFF Franziska SpecimenFF Franziska SpecimenFF Franziska SpecimenFF Franziska SpecimenFF Franziska SpecimenFF Franziska Specimen

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At Home with Albert-Jan Pool

In the latest edition of our ‘At Home With’ series we visited the home of type designer and lecturer Albert-Jan Pool.

For about 20 years, Pool has been involved in the development of FF DIN, which today is one of our most popular font families. In 2011 the Museum of Modern Art in New York added FF DIN to its permanent collection further establishing the family as one of the most worldly recognised and respected. He is also responsible for adding FF DIN Round to the family and also created another technically orientated typeface:  FF OCR-F.

Pictured here in his country house where he resides with his wife and daughter, we see evidence of Pool’s unabiding love of typography throughout the tasteful rooms. From the rows upon rows of typographic books to quirky and inspirational type design pieces hung about the walls this really is the home of a type fanatic.

At Home With Albert-Jan PoolAt Home With Albert-Jan PoolAt Home With Albert-Jan PoolAt Home With Albert-Jan PoolAt Home With Albert-Jan PoolAt Home With Albert-Jan PoolAt Home With Albert-Jan PoolAt Home With Albert-Jan PoolAt Home With Albert-Jan PoolAt Home With Albert-Jan PoolAt Home With Albert-Jan PoolAt Home With Albert-Jan PoolAt Home With Albert-Jan PoolAt Home With Albert-Jan PoolAt Home With Albert-Jan PoolAt Home With Albert-Jan PoolAt Home With Albert-Jan PoolAt Home With Albert-Jan PoolAt Home With Albert-Jan PoolAt Home With Albert-Jan Pool

 

FontFonts by Albert-Jan Pool:

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DIN

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DIN Round

line OCR-F




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FF Chartwell and FF Tundra In-Use: Huawei Project

In our latest “In-Use” case we caught up with the team over at Berlin based communications agency Blumberry to chat to them about their latest project in which FF Chartwell and FF Tundra were a saving grace.

Who was your client and what was the topic of this project?

Our client was Huawei Technologies Germany GmbH, one of the leading suppliers of telecommunication solutions employing more than 150,000 people across 140 countries.

The project, named “Germany and China - Perception and Reality” was carried out in cooperation with the renowned German Institute of Global and Area Studies in Hamburg (GIGA) and the market research institute TNS Emnid in Bielefeld. Its aim was to examine the perceptions that Germans and Chinese have of one another in order to identify stereotypes before assessing them in a scientific context. In other words, what perceptions do the different nationalities have of each other and can they be refuted by facts?

Huawei had initially ran the study two years previous and so were keen to compare these results with those from the new study. However to use both lots of data to create a large, graphically and scientifically complex document that could be made accessible to a wider audience without hindering the scientific element of the content presented us with quite a challenge.

 

- How many people were involved?

As a team we were required to handle all aspects of presenting the survey results, and so during peak periods we had up to 15 people on the team.

Our responsibilities included the programming of the study’s microsite, implementation of a lavishly staged exhibition of the study results (in the form of an Experience Walk) and the production of collateral such as posters and bags.

 

- How did you decide on the layout?

The layout of the previous study was a great help. From this we were able to quickly see what worked with the data and what could be improved. We initially tried several versions of the layout, from the multi-column to single-column pages, as we wanted to avoid the graphics and text appearing to have no visible connection to each other. Instead, they should relate to one another and not inhibit the flow when reading the text. Against this background the one-sided layout proved to be the most effective.

 

- How did you choose the typefaces that featured in the final project? And in what way did the chosen typefaces help with production of the document?

We made the selection of typefaces very early on in the design process. We tried and tested multiple typefaces, including a sans serif typeface that is defined in the design manual. However, in continuous text weaknesses were obvious instantly – after all this particular sans serif typeface was originally designed for “way finding” and not for ease of reading when used for lengthy texts. For this reason, it was clear that we needed a serif for such an extensive study. Moving from the expressive FF Yoga and FF Tisa, we finally decided on the very reader-friendly FF Tundra by Ludwig ÜbeleFF Tundra’s quality in single-column layout with above-average long lines, made it the perfect choice for the study’s text.

For the development of the study’s graphics there was no way to avoid using FF Chartwell by Travis Kochel

With its focus around numerical data we hoped that FF Chartwell would save us an enormous amount of time. We had only a few weeks to build a variety of graphics from a data bundle of more than 1,000 pages, of which many of them contained graphical information and statistics.

Once we had all of the necessary data identified, extracted and excess material removed, the clear simplicity of FF Chartwell was very welcome. We would even go as far to say that had we been without this “chart tool” it would have been an even greater challenge to deliver on time.

Within a study of this size it is easy for mistakes to be missed. A graphical tool, such as FF Chartwell, helped to keep these errors to a minimum, because it works “only” by entering numbers, which as a result made the entire process less error prone.

We were also very grateful for FontFont’s detailed documentation on FF Chartwell as well as the useful tips and tricks from FontFont’s Jens Kutilek’s video tutorial. As a result even our consultants could proofread the entire study and make corrections via InDesign’s simplified mode without having to be taught about OpenType features first.

 

- What was the theme for the illustrations?

The style of the illustrations was closely coordinated with that of FF Chartwell – simple, clear and concise. This resulted in simple icons that clearly illustrated the content without lacking details.

lineHuawei Blumberry StudyHuawei Blumberry Study

left to right: Lars (concept and design), Christin (illustrations), Denise (concept) and Maurits (microsite and app).

Huawei Blumberry StudyHuawei Blumberry StudyHuawei Blumberry StudyHuawei Blumberry StudyHuawei Blumberry StudyHuawei Blumberry StudyHuawei Blumberry StudyHuawei Blumberry StudyHuawei Blumberry StudyHuawei Blumberry StudyHuawei Blumberry Study

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Survey impressions

lineHuawei Blumberry StudyHuawei Blumberry StudyHuawei Blumberry StudyHuawei Blumberry StudyHuawei Blumberry StudyHuawei Blumberry StudyHuawei Blumberry StudyHuawei Blumberry StudyHuawei Blumberry StudyHuawei Blumberry StudyHuawei Blumberry StudyHuawei Blumberry StudyHuawei Blumberry StudyHuawei Blumberry Studyline

For more information on these FontFont typefaces and further buying options head to fontfont.com.

Interview hosted by Alexander Roth, FontFont Marketing department.

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