Best Collection FontFonts for logo, branding and corporate identity

October 30th, 2012

We are confronted by logos and branding on a daily basis and yet some of the most memorable logos are composed of just a typeface. But how do you choose the right typeface to fit the face of your brand? Making sure the face is recognizable, useable and at the same time interchangeable, is by no means an easy task. In the fourth installment of our Collection Tier Blog series, we bring together our top three tips and a selection of FontFonts from our Collection Tier that are suitable for logo, branding and corporate identity projects.

FF Typeface Six

 FF Typeface Six

FF Marten

FF Marten

FF Moonbase Alpha

FF Moonbase Alpha

FF Govan

FF Govan 

FF Zapata

FF Zapata

Frank Sinatra School of Art, design by Pentagram


 

Memorability: Your logotype and your corporate typefaces don’t have to be the same – but they should harmonize, visually. Make your logo unique. Many logos use no type at all, but every logo will be paired with text. Your branding and CI faces can be individual, too, but their primary function is to be recognizable and readable. Choose selections that differentiate your brand from competitors, while still appearing clear and ‘corporate’. Although many companies rely on modern or humanist sans serif typefaces for their identities, your brand’s face could be a serif.

 

Usability: Does your typeface family have enough weights and widths to support a strong typographic hierarchy? Consider how much differentiation is necessary between the elements in your documents, both for internal corporate communications and external advertising. A superfamily, with sans and serif variants, may be an apt choice. Families with optical sizes for text and display help, too – a logo and the text around it should function well in virtually every size and resolution.

 

Interchangeability: Corporate fonts are rarely used in isolation. Depending on a company’s communication strategy, your faces are likely to be seen together with other types, too. How well does your selection play with others? If your corporate fonts have to degrade to standard fonts in certain settings – like online or in office memos – can your design cope with this substitution? Which typographic extras typically appear in your corporate documents (e.g., small caps, tabular figures and fractions)? Consider the fonts’ default glyphs, as your fonts may also be used in office applications that don’t easily support OpenType features.

 

Did you miss out on our previous Collection Tier posts? Have a look at our tips and picks for Music and Nightlife, Sports and Book Text. Next up in our series, our Collection Tier selection suitable for Advertising and Packaging. 

About our Collection Tier

Our Collection Tier FontFonts are a selection of cost effective typographical treasures offered as full-families. All packages are available in OpenType with Standard language support (with a few key exceptions) and are all affordably priced under €/$ 100 each.