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Festive FontFont Favorites

In need of a little font inspiration for the festive season? We asked Inka, one of our Font Engineers and Type Designers, to come up with her list of favorite festive FontFonts. Inka talks us through her choices:

Acanthus

FF Acanthus is a beautifully drawn typeface, one that invites you to tell a story. If you look closely in the OpenType features you can even find Rudolph the Reindeer’s nose!

Nexus Italic

FF Nexus Serif is a real hidden gem and the added swash features give it a real festive feel. 

Schmalhans

Hans Reichel’s first FontFont, FF Schmalhans is simply splendid. Graceful and space-saving, it’s very legible. Perfect for Christmas Card greetings or a long Christmas wish list. 

Prater Script

FF Prater Script is fresh, jolly and hip.

Kievit Thin

FF Kievit Thin set in large text is a real delight for the eye.

How to compile your own favorites list

  • Browse our FontFonts and find something you like
  • Then just ‘heart’ the single weight or the entire family and it will be added to your favorites

To share your list with others, just tick the box ‘link is public’ and you can send the link to friends or colleagues. To edit your list, you just need to make sure you are signed up for an account on our site.

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December 19th, 2014 Comments

We are hiring!

Team

We are hiring! If you have a passion for type and typography and would like to work with us in the heart of Berlin, read on.

We are looking for a highly skilled and experienced Type Designer & Font Technician for our Font Development Team in Berlin (formerly Fontshop International). We hope to welcome our new colleague as soon as possible.

Key Responsibilities

  • Coordinate font development projects for new library fonts as well as customer-orientated font solutions, in collaboration with type designers and QA staff
  • Take on type design tasks to accelerate defined projects
  • Work independently on fine-tuning tasks such as definition of OpenType features, mark positioning, and font administrative core data.
  • Develop macros or scripts to automate manufacturing processes
  • Continuously extend knowledge about current font technology trends, Non-Latin scripts and corresponding writing systems, as well as general typographic aspects
  • Provide support to our sales and marketing teams on request

Qualifications

  • Bachelor or Master Degree in Visual Communication or a software oriented technical course of studies; ideally combined with 2–5 years experience as a font engineer or type designer with a technical background
  • Very good font editing skills using standard font tools (i.e. Fontlab, Adobe FDK, RoboFont, Glyphs, DTL Font Master, etc.)
  • Font technology knowledge with respect to different font formats, OpenType layout features and Unicode. Ideally Python scripting know-how and solid knowledge of XML.
  • Ideally basic knowledge of at least one complex script or writing system (e.g. Arabic, Chinese, Devanagari, Hebrew, etc.)
  • Project management experience. Well-structured work methodology and capability to handle multiple projects in parallel
  • Good to very good communication skills in English. German language skills is a plus

Job location

  • Berlin, Germany

We offer:

  • Be part of an enthusiastic team working closely with type designers, established and new talent, from all over the world
  • Lots of opportunities to learn as well as determine the future of font making
  • Close cooperation with the web development and marketing teams
  • Attractive salary package

Please send your application with CV to Andreas Frohloff: andreas@fontfont.de

Company description

The FontFont library is part of the Monotype family. Monotype is a leading global provider of type, technology and expertise, enabling optimal user experiences and brand integrity. We offer one of the world’s largest and most highly regarded typeface libraries, as well as innovative solutions that bring the power of type to life. We help creative professionals distinguish their work by employing exceptional type and advanced technologies in service to their imaginations. 

Read all about the team in Berlin.

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FF Utility Weight Extension

FF Utility

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A creative and contemporary sans serif, Lukas Schneider’s FF Utility has acquired Thin & Extra Light weights to its now seven weight roster. Both new weights are perfect for anyone working with larger text such as headlines.

The original design grew out of Lukas Schneider’s graduate thesis project, a small family of typefaces named Gazoline, designed while he was studying at the Hochschule für Gestaltung Offenbach (HfG) in Germany. 

With its Thin to Black weights there is no real need for italics, as it is customary to use weight to create emphasis in this type of design—Bold for text set in the light weight, or Black for text set in regular. 

Each FF Utility font contains four figure sets, small caps, as well as an alternate ‘a’ and ‘g’ to increase its typographic flexibility. 

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FF Utility

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FF Utility

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FF Utility

With the additon of Thin and Extra Light, the family now contains seven weights. Thin and Extra Light were designed to be set in larger sizes and work great as headlines or for display use.

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FF Utility

Each weight has a corresponding set of arrows.

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FF Utility

The alternatives of the ‘a’ and ‘g’ give you the option of a more streamlined look.

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FF Utility

FF Utility Thin

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FF Utility

FF Utility Extra Light

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FF Utility

FF Utility Light

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FF Utility

FF Utility Regular

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FF Utility

FF Utility Medium

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FF Utility

FF Utility Bold

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FF Utility

FF Utility Black

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FF Milo Slab Release

FF Milo Slab

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Working together with Jesse Vega, designer Mike Abbink has been developing FF Milo Slab over the course of several years in order to make a new perfect companion for the Milo family.

Adjustments include increased contrast, longer ascenders and descenders and modified glyphs in the heavier weights. All these changes go on to create a typeface that feels similar to the rest of the Milo family but with its own personality. 

dotted lineFF Milo Slab

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FF Milo Slab

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FF Milo Slab

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FF Milo Slab

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FF Milo Slab

FF Milo Slab Thin & Thin Italic

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FF Milo Slab

FF Milo Slab Extra Light & Extra Light Italic

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FF Milo Slab

FF Milo Slab Light & Light Italic

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FF Milo Slab

FF Milo Slab Regular & Regular Italic

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FF Milo Slab

FF Milo Text & Text Italic

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FF Milo Slab

FF Milo Medium & Medium Italic

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FF Milo Slab

FF Milo Bold & Bold Italic

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FF Milo Slab

FF Milo Extra Bold & Extra Bold Italic

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FF Milo Slab

FF Milo Black & Black Italic

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The FF Milo Superfamily

Mike Abbink began work on FF Milo in 2000 with the goal of creating a compact typeface with very short ascenders and descenders. Because of its compact design FF Milo is a workhorse typeface suitable for magazine and newspaper typography. It has modern bones with a touch of detail for distinction (especially in the italics). The designer named the typeface after a resilient grain because, much like corn or grain is for many cultures, FF Milo is intended to be a solid staple of any typographic diet.

With the help of Paul van der Laan for kerning, spacing and production, Mike Abbink went on to develop FF Milo Serif as a companion to the FF Milo family. 

In comparison with its siblings, the slab has a more horizontal feel, due in large part to the adjustment of its terminal angles to accommodate the slabs. FF Milo Slab also takes a few cues from classic Egyptian style slabs rather than looking to the sans or serif for inspiration. You can see this in the italic ‘v’, ‘w’ and ‘y’ where slabs take the place of the flared terminals present in both the sans and serif.

All three members of this must have superfamily come with features essential for serious typographic composition: nine weights, small caps, old style figures, lining figures and tabular figures as well as some alternative glyphs to stir things up. Each member works well both united and alone.

FF Milo was selected by the ATypI as one of the best typefaces of the first decade of the 21st century during their Letter.2 competition in 2011.

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FF Milo Slab

FF Milo

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FF Milo Slab

FF Milo Slab

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FF Milo Slab

FF Milo Serif

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December 2nd, 2014 Comments

FF Bauer Grotesk in action

FF Bauer Grotesk

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FF Bauer Grotesk is a revival of the metal type Friedrich Bauer Grotesk, released between 1933 and 1934 by the foundry Trennert & Sohn in Hamburg Altona, Germany. The geometric construction of the typeface, infused with the Art Déco zeitgeist of that era, is closely related to famous German designs such as Futura, Erbar, Kabel and Super Grotesk that debuted a few years earlier. However, Bauer Grotesk stands out for not being so dogmatic with the geometry, lending the design a warmer, more homogenous feeling. The oval ‘O’ is a good example of this approach, as are characteristic shapes like the capital ‘M’ or the unconventional varying stroke endings on the ‘c’ and ‘s’ which give them a less constructed look.

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FF Bauer Grotesk

Thomas Ackermann and Felix Bonge equipped FF Bauer Grotesk with a large variety of alternate characters in the upright and italic weights respectively, e.g. a lower case ‘e’ with two different stroke endings, ‘t’ with a straight and a round terminal. It also comes with playful umlauts such as the dots in the bowl of the ‘Ü’. 

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FF Bauer Grotesk

All fonts come in eight astonishing sets of figures, including playful numerals in square or circular outlines—both positive and negative. All these sets have alternative shapes for figures ‘1’, ‘2’, ‘4’ and ‘7’. 

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FF Bauer Grotesk

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FF Bauer Grotesk

A selection of shapes, arrows and even hands (with little sleeves) round off the font. What’s more, note the selection of “Hanseatic features”: an umbrella, an anchor and the coat of arms of the city of Altona.

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FF Bauer Grotesk

True to the historic examples of Friedrich-Bauer-Grotesk and Genzsch-Grotesk, FF Bauer Grotesk is equipped with both pointing and flat climaxes in ‘A’, ‘M’, ‘N’, ‘V’, and ‘W’.

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FF Bauer Grotesk

While ‘G’ and ‘R’ feature a high “art-deco-waist” in Friedrich-Bauer-Grotesk, they have been digitized in that historic model as well as in more contemporary shapes. ‘Q’ also comes in its original appearance as well as in two new alternative forms. 

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FF Bauer Grotesk

FF Bauer Grotesk features all ligatures in demand. Of course some of them have different sets of stroke endings. Unfortunately the ‘fff’-ligature cannot be used in German words such as Sauerstoffflasche or Schifffahrt—that would be considered a typo. 

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FF Bauer Grotesk

FF Bauer Grotesk Light

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FF Bauer Grotesk

FF Bauer Grotesk Light Italic

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FF Bauer Grotesk

FF Bauer Grotesk Regular

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FF Bauer Grotesk

FF Bauer Grotesk Regular Italic

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FF Bauer Grotesk

FF Bauer Grotesk Book

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FF Bauer Grotesk

FF Bauer Grotesk Book Italic

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FF Bauer Grotesk Medium

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FF Bauer Grotesk

FF Bauer Grotesk Medium Italic

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FF Bauer Grotesk

FF Bauer Grotesk Demi Bold

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FF Bauer Grotesk

FF Bauer Grotesk Demi Bold Italic

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FF Bauer Grotesk

FF Bauer Grotesk Bold

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FF Bauer Grotesk

FF Bauer Grotesk Bold Italic

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The Unveiling of FF 68!

We are excited to introduce our final release of 2014! As usual it is jam-packed with typographic treats: From the revival of a hidden gem to new weights for a FontFont favorite to a slab serif sister for one of our most in-demand typefaces. And if this wasn’t enough, our newly updated Web FontFonts raise the bar for enhanced web typography again. 

FF Bauer GroteskNew Design: FF Bauer Grotesk

First off, we welcome FF Bauer Grotesk – the highly anticipated revival of the Friedrich-Bauer-Grotesk typeface – originally released in 1934 by the Hamburg-Altona-based foundry, J. D. Trennert & Sohn. Friedrich Bauer designed his Grotesk with a nod to famous German designs such as Futura, Erbar, Kabel and Super Grotesk; its geometric construction is infused with a touch of Art Deco. Fast forward eighty years to Thomas Ackermann and Felix Bonge’s warmer and more homogenous adaptation FF Bauer Grotesk. It is ideal for those looking for something with historical weight to use across editorial, packaging, publishing, and ephemera. 

 FF Milo Slab

New Design: FF Milo Slab

FF Milo Slab is the newest member of Mike Abbink’s FF Milo super family. Singularly distinct and yet reassuringly solid, the slab retains many similarities of its sans and serif counterparts,but has undergone a wide range of careful adjustments from increased contrast, longer ascenders and descenders and modified glyphs in the heavier weights. All of these changes amount to a typeface that feels like FF Milo but with an identity of its own. The result of several years development between FF Milo designer Mike Abbink and Jesse Vega, FF Milo Slab comes with similar features to its siblings including nine weights, small caps, old style, lining, and tabular figures as well as some alternative glyphs to mix it up.

A perfect workhorse typeface suitable for headlines, posters/banners, magazines and advertising. 

FF Utility

 

New Weights: FF Utility

A creative and contemporary sans serif, Lukas Schneider’s FF Utility has acquired Thin & Extra Light weights to its now seven weight roster. An extremely legible typeface, FF Utility sets a mean line of text and can be used for almost anything. Both new weights are perfect for anyone working with larger text such as headlines.

 

New Functionality: Web FontFonts with OpenType Layout Features

We are delighted to announce that as of today the majority of our Web FontFonts now include OpenType Layout Features. This means that you can spice up your web identity through the magic of ligatures, stylistic alternates, figure sets, fractions, small caps and even swashes (if available in the font). With these advanced typographic features,  specifically built for the web and supported by all desktop browsers (except Safari), OpenType gives you endless opportunities to bring online type to life. See them in action on our microsite and watch the video we created in collaboration with Stark Films.

What’s more, we’ve streamlined and improved our webfont formats and fully updated the free Subsetter tool so that you can customize your Web FontFonts for optimum performance.

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Web FontFonts now with OpenType Layout Features

Introducing: Web FontFonts with OpenType layout features, streamlined formats and the new and improved Subsetter

We are delighted to announce that our Web FontFonts now include OpenType Layout Features. What’s more we’ve simplified our webfont formats and updated the free Subsetter tool, so you can now customize your Web FontFonts for optimum performance.

OpenType Web Magic 

With OpenType Layout Features, you can spice up your web identity through the magic of ligatures, stylistic alternates, figure sets, fractions, small caps and even swashes (if available in the font). Thanks to a selection of 1,600 Web FontFonts, your typographic toolbox is bigger and better equipped than ever before. With beautifully advanced typographic features that are supported by all desktop browsers (except Safari), OpenType gives you endless opportunities to bring type to life. 

It may seem like an obvious question, but what are OpenType layout features?

Essentially it’s the ‘technology behind good type’. It’s a standard font format that provides you with a typographic toolkit (layout features) to enrich and enhance type. For many years, you could only really use OpenType technology in a few select desktop publishing applications, but the time has come to bring these features to life on the web. 

Up till recently typographic gems such as FF Mister K were not able to function as a Web FontFont, in fact many script fonts wouldn’t work well without OpenType features. However with this latest update, we can now welcome FF Mister K Web to the webfont family. Other FontFonts that have benefited from this update include FF DIN, (you can now use the famous alternative @ sign online) and FF Duper. All FF Duper weights contain three versions of each glyph, which when put into a text the stylistic alternative OpenType feature uses all three alternatives in succession. It treats vowels and consonants separately and even recognizes spaces between words creating a lively and hand-made appearance of the typed text. You can find out which particular features are included in specific fonts on single weights’ OpenType Layout Features tab. 

Web FontFonts with OpenType layout featuresImproved Formats and Subsetting

What’s more, we’ve now streamlined and improved our Web FontFont formats. Now you will receive a single webfont format only — WOFF, which provides the most up-to-date compatibility and includes OpenType features. Using our improved Subsetter website you can customize your Web FontFont to make the files lighter and faster to load and thereby save on bandwidth costs. You can produce Web TTF and EOT formats using Subsetter should you need them (these formats are suitable for older, outdated browsers). However, bear in mind that EOT won’t contain OpenType layout features nor kerning and that whilst TTF contains these features it is only supported by older browsers.

Take a look at Web FontFonts in action on our microsite and watch the video we created in collaboration with Stark Films again.

Want to see what your website looks like with a Web FontFont before you buy? Head to FontShop’s Webfonter.

 

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FontFont to sponsor the 5th Meeting of Typography

5th Meeting of Typography

We are proud to sponsor the 5th Meeting of Typography in Portugal. Taking place in Barcelos in Portugal from 28 – 29 November 2014, the theme for this year is Ubiquitous

With keynote speakers including Gerry Leonidas, Dave Crossland and Miguel Sousa, the four day event brings together industry practitioners, teachers, researchers and students to discuss typographic research and share experiences.

On the 26 – 27 November there will also be a number of workshops taking place, including two on type design, one on Letterpress and Binding and a Typewalk around Barcelos. There will also be an exhibition of rare calligraphy books The Art of Writing in Several Hands from Dino dos Santos’ Collection.

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FF Franziska wins again

FF Franziska Joseph Binder AwardThere has been a flurry of award wins for FF Franziska recently including the Communication Arts award, an ISTD Certificate of Excellence and now the latest addition to join the trophy cabinet for Jakob Runge’s hybrid of a slab and serif is the Joseph Binder Award.

Founded in 1996, the international competition centres on illustration and graphic design and is named after one of Austria’s most pre-eminent graphic designers, Joseph Binder, who was prolific during the first half of the 20th century.

The awards ceremony took place in Vienna’s MuseumQuartier a couple of weeks ago and FF Franziska was awarded the Gold Prize in the Type Design category. There was a record number of entries this year with over 690 submissions from 29 countries (over twice the number of entrants compared to the previous competition). In total 36 trophies were awarded and a further 43 projects received a recognition.

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FontFont sponsors Typomad 2014

TYPOMAD 2014

We are delighted to be sponsors of next week’s Typomad conference, which is happening in Madrid from 14 – 15 November 2014. 

This year’s focus is on ‘What is hidden in typography’ with numerous talks, workshops and events taking place around the city.

There are still a few tickets, grab them whilst you can!

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November 3rd, 2014 Comments